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The Royal College of Psychiatrists books Reviewed in 2012

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Madness at the Theatre
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Femi Oyebode
ISBN: 9781908020420
Publishers: Royal College of Psychiatrists
Price: 15
College members' price: 13.50
Publication Date: July 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Madness at the Theatre studies the theatrical representation of madness from the classical Greek period through to the 21st century.
 
Professor Oyebode charts the portrayal of madness by the world's great playwrights across the centuries and argues that whereas acts of madness are described but unseen in Greek drama, Shakespeare brought these behaviours to centre stage. In the 19th and early 20th centuries aberrant behaviour was portrayed in domestic settings by Ibsen - theatrical madness became a family drama. Tennessee Williams and Eugene O'Neill drew on their own families for their explorations of madness and addiction, which lent a freshness and authenticity to their characters. Pinter's masterful use of the ambiguity of language finds strong echoes in the psychiatric clinic. Soyinka approached the subject from a different perspective, emphasising the social context - the personal malady as reflection of a greater malaise in society. Finally, Sarah Kane, whose own mental illness shaped her work, created plays that were the physical embodiment of her inner world.
This book deals with an aspect of drama that speaks to the fears, prejudices and insights of the audience. It makes explicit the rules and models governing the appropriation of madness as a metaphor within theatre.
Readership: It will be essential reading for anyone interested in the language of drama, the depiction of mental illness, and in the wider place of madness as a concept within society.

The Author:

Femi Oyebode is Professor and Head of Department of Psychiatry, University of Birmingham. He has published widely on the relationship between literature and psychiatry. His research interests include descriptive psychopathology and delusional misidentification syndromes. He is also a poet and literary critic.

Contents

Preface
Greek tragedy and models of madness
Greco-Roman comedy and folly
Jealousy the green-eyed monster and madness in Shakespeare
Ibsen and the domestication of madness
Tennessee Williams and the theatre of the mind
Soyinka's theatre of the shadowlands
Sarah Kane: the self in fission

"I would emphasise that psychiatry has important links with all arts, especially opera and literature. Understanding 'bizarre' behaviour of human beings through the arts is an effective way to integrate psychodynamic understanding." - Dr Estela Welldon

Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist in Psychotherapy, The Portman Clinic (Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust), London (e-Interview fromThe Psychiatrist 36:3, March 2012.)

Quote from the author:

"Theatre is one of the greatest achievements of the human spirit. It combines storytelling with the concrete expression and enactment of the action. It uses language, music, dance, dress, props, and lighting to create an illusion and to influence the emotional life of the audience. It is singularly the most exacting and thrilling of the arts. Mental life is its source and its nourishment." - Femi Oyebode


For more Information on "Madness at the Theatre" go to the Royal College of Psychiatrists Website:

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Clinical Topics in Personality Disorder
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Jaydip Sarkar and Gwen Adshead
ISBN: 9781908020390
Publishers: royal College of Psychiatrists
Price: Price: 30.00, College members' price: 27.00
Publication Date: July 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Personality disorder used to be a diagnosis of exclusion, a condition deemed 'untreatable'. This situation has been transformed in the past 10 years, with a huge expansion of research and clinical interest in personality disorders: what it is like to have a personality disorder, what sort of services are helpful, what treatments work best and what staff need to know.
This book provides an expert synthesis of these clinical advances. It covers the nature of personality disorders, assessment, diagnosis and classification, management and a broad range of therapeutic approaches. Written by practitioners with real expertise in the field, the book is equally suitable for psychiatric trainees and more experienced clinicians from the full range of disciplines in mental healthcare.
Up to date and comprehensive.
Includes service user experiences.
Draws on a wealth of real clinical experience.
Eclectic range of therapies and approaches.
Covers all age groups and specialist settings.
Five chapters have been specially commissioned for this book, while previous versions of the other 15 chapters have been published in the journal Advances in Psychiatric Treatment - many have been extensively updated by the authors.
Readership: Particularly relevant for any healthcare professionals caring for those with personality disorder.
It will also be useful for psychiatric trainees, those working in forensic services and anyone in the multi-disciplinary mental health team.

The editors:

Jaydip Sarkar - Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist, East Midlands Centre for Forensic Mental Health, Leicester.
Gwen Adshead - Consultant Forensic Psychotherapist, Broadmoor Hospital, Berks.
 

Contents

  Part 1: The nature of the problem
1. The nature of personality disorder
2. Differences between psychopathy and other personality disorders: evidence from neuroimaging
3. Challenges in the treatment of dangerous and severe personality disorder
4. Are you looking at me? Understanding and managing paranoid personality disorder
5. Personality disorder in older people: how common is it and what can be done?
6. Management of common personality disorders in the acute setting
7. Personality disorder in women
8. Personality disorder in adolescence
  Part 2: Management and general treatment approaches
9. Assessment of personality disorder
10. Diagnosis and classification of personality disorder: difficulties, their resolution and implications for practice
11. Murmurs of discontent: treatment and treatability of personality disorder
12. Personality disorder: its impact on staff and the role of supervision
  Part 3: Specific treatment approaches
13. Treating personality disorder: methods and outcomes
14. Skills-based therapies for personality disorder
15. Insight-oriented therapies for personality disorder
16. Treatment approaches for severe personality disorder
17. Mindfulness in the psychotherapy of personality disorder
18. Cognitive analytic therapy for borderline personality disorder
19. Contemporary therapeutic communities: complex treatment for complex needs
20. Nidotherapy: making the environment do the therapeutic work

Summary

The lack of a medically grounded approach to personality disorder and its management has led to its comparative neglect as a topic by many clinicians in the UK. In this article we present evidence that personality disorders are, like other mental disorders, the social manifestations of a pathological process. This process presents with characteristic clinical features that are developmental in nature. These cause disturbances in arousal, affect and reality testing that have an impact on interpersonal social functioning. Personality disorder may therefore be conceived of primarily as a socioemotional disability, not dissimilar to Axis I conditions.

Sample from the Book

The nature of personality disorder

The term 'personality' derives from the Greek word persona or mask. It refers both to an individual's attitudes and ways of thinking, feeling and behaving, and to the social ways in which individuals interact with their environment. At an individual level, personality is not a single unitary entity, but a way to organise a number of different capacities that underpin one's sense of self (Allport, 1961). At a social level, an individual personality profile allows one to be recognised over time by others, and is a powerful regulator of social relationships, which, as we are group animals, are crucial for our survival.

For more Information on "Clinical Topics in Personality Disorder" go to the Royal College of Psychiatrists Website:

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Self-Harm: The NICE Guideline on Longer-term Management
National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH)
Edition: 2012
Format: Paperback + free CD-ROM
Author: RCPsych
ISBN: 9781908020413
Publishers: RCPsych
Price: 50
Publication Date: 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Self-harm is common, especially in young people. It increases the likelihood that the person will eventually die by suicide by between 50- and 100-fold above the rest of the population in a 12-month period. A wide range of psychiatric conditions are associated with self-harm, such as borderline personality disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and drug and alcohol-use disorders.
The focus of this guideline is to improve the longer-term care of people who self-harm after initial treatment of the injury or poisoning (it covers people aged 8 years and older). It reviews the evidence for comprehensive assessment, psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for both the self-harm and for any associated psychiatric conditions, staff training, and consent, capacity and confidentiality issues. It contains all the evidence on which the recommendations were based, including further data on a free CD-ROM.
Now the only place to obtain this NICE guidance in print.
Readership: The guideline will be useful to healthcare professionals in hospital medical care and mental health services, plus general practitioners - as about half of the people who attend an emergency department after an incident of self-harm will have visited their GP in the previous month.
NICE Mental Health Guidelines
These guidelines from NICE set out clear recommendations, based on the best available evidence, for health care professionals on how to work with and implement physical, psychological and service-level interventions for people with various mental health conditions.
The book contains the full guidelines that cannot be obtained in print anywhere else. It brings together all of the evidence that led to the recommendations made, detailed explanations of the methodology behind their preparation, plus an overview of the condition covering detection, diagnosis and assessment, and the full range of treatment and care approaches.
The accompanying free CD-ROM contains all the data used as evidence, including:
Included and excluded studies.
Profile tables that summarise both the quality of the evidence and the results of the evidence synthesis.
All meta-analytical data, presented as forest plots.
Detailed information about how to use and interpret forest plots.

Contents

Preface
Introduction to self-harm
Methods used to develop this guideline
Experience of care
Training
Psychosocial assessment
Psychosocial interventions
Pharmacological interventions
Consent, capacity and confidentiality
Appendices
References
Abbreviations

Part of the Introduction

The term self-harm is used in this guideline to refer to any act of self-poisoning or self-injury carried out by an individual irrespective of motivation (Hawton et al., 2003a). This commonly involves self-poisoning with medication or self-injury by cutting. There are a number of important exclusions that this term is not intended to cover. These include harm to the self arising from excessive consumption of alcohol or recreational drugs, mismanagement of physical health conditions, body piercing or starvation arising from anorexia nervosa. In the past, various other terms have been used including 'parasuicide' and 'attempted suicide' (Kreitman, 1977), the latter to describe self-harm in which the primary motivation is to end life. However, it became evident that motivation is complex and does not fall neatly into such categories.
Terms such as 'non fatal deliberate self-harm' (Morgan et al., 1975) were preferred because they avoided making inferences about the motivation behind the behaviour. However, the word 'deliberate' is no longer preferred because it can be considered judgemental and it has been argued that the extent to which the behaviour is 'deliberate' or 'intentional' is not always clear - those who harm themselves during a dissociative state often describe diminished or absent awareness of their actions at these times.
How common is self-harm?

Population estimates of the prevalence of self-harm in the community vary considerably. One cross-national study of 17 countries found that an average of 2.7% of people reported a previous episode of self-harm, but with considerable variation between 0.5% in Italy and 5% in the US (Nock et al., 2008). This variation may well reflect a person's willingness to report self-harm. In the UK, an adult psychiatric morbidity survey collected self-reported data on 'attempted suicide' and 'self-harm' (McManus et al., 2009), according to whether or not the person reported that they had intended to take their life. Overall 5.6% reported lifetime suicide attempts (6.9% of women and 4.3% of men) with 0.7% reporting this had occurred in the last year. Self reported lifetime history of self-harm (without lethal intent) was slightly less common: 4.9% overall (5.4% of women and 4.4% of men). Self-harm can occur at any age but is most common in young people. In this guideline, children and young people are defined as people aged 8 to 17 years, inclusive.

In Meltzer and colleagues' survey (2001) of 12,529 children and young people aged 5 to 15 years, 1.3% had tried to harm themselves. Data in this survey was collected from parental interviews; when information is obtained directly from young people, rates are considerably higher. Hawton and colleagues (2002) conducted a questionnaire survey of 6,020 Year 11 pupils in the Oxford area. They reported that 13.2% of young people responding had self-harmed at some point in their lives, 6.9% in the previous year. Only 12.6% of those who had harmed themselves had presented to hospital, the vast majority of acts of self-harm being 'invisible' to professionals. Although rates of self-harm vary between countries (Madge et al., 2008), research in England, Canada and Australia between 2002 and 2005 indicated that the lifetime rate of self-harm in schools was 12 to 15% (De Leo & Heller, 2004; Ross & Heath, 2002). In contrast, only approximately 5% of all episodes of self-harm occur in people over the age of 65 (Dennis et al., 1997; raper, 1996). Much of the detailed epidemiological study of self-harm has been based in hospital settings and suggests self-harm might account for over 200,000 hospital attendances in England every year (Hawton et al., 2007). Recent data from Oxford, Manchester and Derby suggested that rates of hospital presentation for self-harm varied at between 400 and 550 per 100,000 per year for women and between 300 and 400 per 100,000 per year for men (Bergen et al., 2010a). Rates fell by between 8 and 21% over an 8-year period (from 2000 to 2007), with a more pronounced fall in men.

For more Information on Self Harm go to the Royal College of Psychiatrists Website:

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Psychosis with Coexisting Substance Misuse
Edition: 1st
Format: Format: Paperback + free CD-ROM
Author: RCPSYCH
ISBN: 9781908020307
Publishers: RCPSYCH
Price: 45
Number of pages: 326
College members' price: 40.50
Publication Date: Nov 2011

Publisher's Title Information

Around 40% of people experiencing psychosis also misuse substances at some point in their lives, which can lead to serious health and social problems for the person and complicate their treatment.
 
This new guideline covers the assessment and management of adults and young people (aged 14 years and older) who have a clinical diagnosis of psychosis (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or other affective psychosis) and coexisting substance misuse (harmful use of any psychotropic substance including alcohol and legal or illicit drugs).
Although separate NICE guidelines have been developed for the management of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and drug and alcohol misuse, the importance of this new guideline on psychosis and substance misuse is in offering advice on how to integrate treatment for people with these commonly coexisting conditions.
The guideline includes comprehensive reviews of assessment, care pathways and service delivery models, psychological and pharmacological interventions for both conditions, and treatment and services for young people.
Readership: All mental health professionals, especially those working in substance misuse services.
List of the other NICE mental health guidelines

NICE Mental Health Guidelines

These guidelines from NICE set out clear recommendations, based on the best available evidence, for health care professionals on how to work with and implement physical, psychological and service-level interventions for people with various mental health conditions.
The book contains the full guidelines that cannot be obtained in print anywhere else. It brings together all of the evidence that led to the recommendations made, detailed explanations of the methodology behind their preparation, plus an overview of the condition covering detection, diagnosis and assessment, and the full range of treatment and care approaches.
The accompanying free CD-ROM contains all the data used as evidence, including:
Included and excluded studies.
Profile tables that summarise both the quality of the evidence and the results of the evidence synthesis.
All meta-analytical data, presented as forest plots.
Detailed information about how to use and interpret forest plots.

Contents

Preface
Psychosis with coexisting substance misuse
Method used to develop this guideline
Experience of care
Assessment and care pathways
Service delivery models
Psychological and psychosocial interventions
Pharmacological and physical interventions
Young people with psychosis and coexisting substance misuse
Summary of recommendations
Appendices
References
Abbreviations

For more Information on Psychosis with Coexisting Substance Misuse go to the Royal College of Psychiatrists Website:

More Information on the Publisher's Website at

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