"INTERNET LAW BOOK REVIEWS" Provided by Rob Jerrard LLB LLM (London)

Oxford University Press: Blackstone's Police Books 2011
Blackstone's Handbook for Policing Students 2012
Edition: 2012
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Robin Bryant, Sarah Bryant, Sofia Graça, Kevin Lawton-Barrett, Roy Murphy, Stephen Tong, Robert Underwood, and Dominic Wood
ISBN: 978-0-19-959522-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £29.99
Publication Date: 15th Sept 2011

Publisher's Title Information

Developed from the best-selling Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook, covering all your requirements regardless of your route into the police force
Divided into six parts, representing key stages in your progression from pre-entry programmes (where appropriate), to initial training and then confirmation
Leads you through topics, covering theory, discussion and practice while developing skills of analysis, problem solving and forms of reasoning
Ensures you have the knowledge and understanding necessary to undertake independent patrol in a professional and competent manner
Tasks interspersed throughout chapters provide further ideas for you to explore, or point you in the direction of additional reading and study
Blackstone's Handbook for Policing Students 2012 has been developed from the best-selling Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook to reflect the multitude of avenues into the police force now open to future police officers, from pre-entry courses to PCSOs and Specials.
 
Completely revised and restructured, helping you find the key areas and meet the new requirements of police training, this book is a must-have for those embarking on a career in the police. Parts of initial police training common to all new entrants are easily identified and there are specific chapters on qualifications structures and training and assessment, meeting the needs of students whether you are entering policing through pre-entry schemes or through an alternative qualification route. This new structure means it is possible for students to omit certain Parts of the Handbook whilst still meeting the mandatory requirements of the revised IPLDP Diploma in Policing.
 
Divided into six parts, representing key stages in your progression from pre-entry programmes (where appropriate) in Parts 1 and 2, to initial training and then confirmation, the Handbook leads you through the topics, covering theory, discussion and practice while developing skills of analysis, problem solving and forms of reasoning. Coupled with a comprehensive and accessible style, the book ensures you have the knowledge and understanding necessary to undertake independent patrol in a professional and competent manner. Key topics covered include Stop, Search, and Entry, Alcohol and Drug Offences, Sexual Offences, Interviewing, and Intelligence.
 
Blackstone's Handbook for Policing Students 2012 is essential reading whether you are taking a pre-entry course or the IPLDP Diploma in Policing, looking to move on from your role as a PCSO or Special, or are involved within the security and law enforcement sector.

Contents

Part I: Overview
1: Introducing the Handbook
2: Reference material
Part II: Policing in Context
3: Policing
4: Crime and Criminality
5: The Criminal Justice System in England and Wales
Part III: Qualifications and Training
6: Roles, Responsibilities, and Support
7: Qualification and Professional Development
8: Education, Training, and Assessment
Part IV: General Procedures
9: Stop, Search, and Entry
10: Initial Investigation, Arrest, Detention, and Disposal
11: Attending Crime Scenes and Other Incidents
Part V: Specific Incidents
12: Alcohol- and Drugs-Related Incidents
13: Policing and Protection from Harm
14: Socially Disruptive and Aggressive Behaviour
15: Unlawful Violence Against Persons and Premises
16: Theft, Fraud, and Related Offences
17: Sexual Offences
18: Weapons Offences
19: Attempted Offences and Encouraging or Assisting Crime
20: Damage to Buildings and Other Property
Part VI: Investigation and Prosecution
21: Road and Traffic Policing
22: Intelligence
23: Criminal Investigation
24: Interviewing
25: Forensic Investigation
26: Prosecution and Court Procedures

Edited by Robin Bryant, Head of Department, Crime & Policing Studies and Academic Director, Thanet Campus, Canterbury Christ Church University, Sarah Bryant, Sofia Graça, Senior Lecturer and Programme Director, MSc in Policing, Canterbury Christ Church University, Kevin Lawton-Barrett, Senior Lecturer and Programme Director, BA/BSc in Forensic Investigation, Canterbury Christ Church University, Roy Murphy, Lecturer in Law and Criminal Justice Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Stephen Tong, Director of Policing, Department of Law and Criminal Justice Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Robert Underwood, Associate tutor, Department of Law and Criminal Justice Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University and former Kent Police officer, and Dominic Wood, Acting Head of Department, Law and Criminal Justice Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University
Dr Robin Bryant is Director of Criminal Justice Practice at Canterbury Christ Church University. He was jointly responsible with Kent Police for establishing an innovative Foundation Degree in Policing for initial police training in Kent, and is an external examiner for a number of universities in the UK that offer programmes in Policing and Criminology. He has edited and contributed to several books on investigation and police training, and published and presented widely on investigative theory.

Sarah Bryant specializes in editing technical, academic material for a wider readership. Her background is in science education and the development of learning materials for adults.

Sofia Graça is a Senior Lecturer, and Programme Director for the MSc in Policing at Canterbury Christ Church University, in collaboration with the Police Academy of the Netherlands.

Kevin Lawton-Barrett is a Senior Lecturer and Programme Director for the BA/BSc in Forensic Investigation at Canterbury Christ Church University. He was formerly an operational Senior CSI at Kent Police and a trainer attached to Kent Police College involved in the training and development of CSIs, police recruits and detectives.

Roy Murphy is a retired detective who has worked for the UK police, HM Government and in the private sector undertaking investigating, training and advising on criminal investigation. He has been an Investigative Adviser and more recently a lecturer in Law and Criminal Justice Studies.

Dr Stephen Tong is Director of Policing and Programme Director of the BSc (Hons) Police Studies & Policing (pre-service) programme in the Department of Law & Criminal Justice Studies at Canterbury Christ Church University.

Robert Underwood is an associate tutor in the Department of Law and Criminal Justice Studies at Canterbury Christ Church University and a former Kent Police officer. Together with colleagues from both organisations he was responsible for the design of the Foundation Degree in Policing which formed the basis of initial police training and education in Kent. He contributes to several other books in the Blackstone's series.

Dr Dominic Wood is Acting Head of Department of Law and Criminal Justice Studies at Canterbury Christ Church University. He is also the Chair of the Higher Education Forum for Learning and Development in Policing.

Review(s) from previous edition

"This volume offers the student police officer an invaluable guide to all aspects of the IPLDP, in particular giving a clear link between learning practical policing skills and the NOS. - Sergeant Steve Shelton, IPLDP Project Manager, Devon and Cornwall Constabulary

Introduction

Blackstone's Handbook for Policing Students is designed and written to support student police officers and students on policing-related pre-entry courses at colleges or universities. It succeeds the highly successful Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook which ran to five editions and was used as a supplement to training by a large number of police forces in England and Wales. The new Handbook has six main parts (Overview, Policing in Context, Qualifications and Training, General Procedures, Specific Incidents, and Investigation and Prosecution). Each part is split into a number of chapters and addresses a different aspect of policing and initial police training. The chapters focus in more detail on specific topics-such as Chapter 5 on the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales (in 'Policing in Context'), Chapter 15 on Unlawful Violence (in 'Specific Incidents'), and Chapter 24 on Interviewing (in 'Investigation and Prosecution%

The content has been revised and updated to reflect the needs of students undertaking pre-entry courses prior to joining the police. It seems likely that such pre-entry courses will provide much of the initial training of entrants to the police and for this reason we have also included curriculum content needed to meet the requirements of the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme (IPLDP). The Handbook thus covers all of the essential knowledge and understanding required prior to joining the police and for any subsequent in-force training as a student police officer.

The authors of the Handbook have taken care to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within. However, neither the authors nor the publisher can accept any responsibility for any actions taken, or not taken, as a consequence of the information it contains. We would be grateful for feedback on the new Handbook, and for the identification of the occasional error. Reader feedback on the sixth edition is welcome. Please email stupoLeditor@OUP.com with your comments or queries.

Please note that references throughout the Handbook to IPLDP materials have not been reviewed or endorsed by the IPLDP Central Authority Executive Services.

The authors wish to thank English Heritage and Chief Inspector Mark Harrison of Kent Police for their contributions to Chapter 20 of this handbook.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at



Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 2012
Edition: 2012
Format: Flexicovers
Author: Andrew Keogh
ISBN: 978-0-19-969282-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £44.95
Publication Date: 20 October 2011
 
Publisher's Title Information

The bestselling complete guide to the magistrates' court
Andrew Keogh offers you a practical resource you can trust
Pocket-sized format is ideal for everyday use at court
Essential extracts from the Magistrates' Court Sentencing Guidelines
Cross-referencing to Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2012 guides you to in-depth commentary
New to this edition
New chapters included on extradition, virtual courts, and the issue of a summons or warrant to witnesses
Expanded coverage of bad character, hearsay, legal aid, and road traffic offences
This new edition of the bestselling Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook provides a complete practical guide for the busy magistrates' court advocate. Incorporating essential extracts from the Magistrates' Court Sentencing Guidelines, Andrew Keogh offers all you need in one trustworthy source.
 
Covering all the key aspects of magistrates' court practice, the book focuses on the areas most likely to arise at short notice requiring an instant response from the advocate, as well as on those offences most frequently experienced at court, such as public order, drugs, weapons, driving, criminal damage, and sexual offences.
 
Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 's easy-to-use pocket-sized format facilitates quick reading and instant decision-making. Tables, flow-charts, and a clear system of icons aid comprehension and speedy navigation. Cross-referencing to Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2012 provides you with easy access to in-depth commentary.

Contents

Part A: Procedure and Evidence
A1: Abuse of Process
A2: Adjournments
A3: Admissibility and Exclusion of Evidence
A4: Advance Information
A5: Amending Charge
A6: Appeals and Reopening
A7: Bad Character
A8: Bail
A9: Binding Rulings
A10: Case Management
A11: Clerks Retiring with Justices
A12: Commencing Proceedings
A13: Constitution and Jurisdiction
A14: Committal, Sending, and Transfer for Trial
A15: Costs (Defendants)
A16: Court Appointed Legal Representatives
A17: Custody Time Limits
A18: Disclosure
A19: Evidence in Civil Cases
A20: Handcuffs Applications
A21: Hearsay
A22: Human Rights
A23: Identification Evidence
A24: Legal Aid
A25: Mental Disorder
A26: Misbehaviour at Court
A27: Mode of Trial, Allocation, and Plea Before Venue
A28: Presence of Defendant in Court
A29: Remand Periods
A30: Reporting Restrictions
A31: Special Measures and Vulnerable Witnesses
A32: Submission of No Case
A33: Transfer of Criminal Cases
A34: Video Links
A35: Warrants
Part B: Youth Court
B1: General Provisions
B2: Mode of Trial and Allocation
B3: Bail: Young Offenders
B4: Sentencing
Part C: Offences
C1: Animal Offences
C2: Anti-Social Behaviour Order, Breach of
C3: Bail, Failure to Surrender
C4: Communication Network Offences
C5: Criminal Damage
C6: Drugs
C7: Education Act
C8: Fail to Comply with Notification Requirements, Sex Offenders Register
C9: Immigration Offences
C10: Prison Offences
C11: Protective Order, Breach of
C12: Public Order
C13: Road Traffic Offences, Definitions
C14: Road Traffic Offences, Suitable for Fine/Discharge
C15: Sexual Offences
C16: Theft, Fraud, and Evasion
C17: Violence Against the Person
Part D: Sentencing
D1: Age of Offender
D2: Alteration of Sentence
D3: Anti-Social Behaviour Orders
D4: Banning Orders
D5: Bind Over
D6: Breach of Community Order
D7: Breach of Supervision Order
D8: Committal for Sentence
D9: Committal for Sentence: Dangerous Young Offender
D10: Community Orders and Sentences: General
D11: Community Punishment and Rehabilitation Orders
D12: Community Punishment Order
D13: Community Rehabilitation Order
D14: Compensation Order
D15: Conditional and Absolute Discharge
D16: Confiscation, Proceeds of Crime Act 2002
D17: Custodial Sentences
D18: Dangerous Offenders
D19: Deferment of Sentence
D20: Deportation, Automatic
D21: Deprivation Order
D22: Detention and Training Order
D23: Detention in Young Offender Institution
D24: Detention under Section 91 PCC(S)A 2000
D25: Discounts for Early Plea
D26: Disqualification from Driving
D27: Disqualification of Company Directors
D28: Drinking Banning Order
D29: Exclusion from Licensed Premises
D30: Exclusion Order
D31: Financial Circumstances Order
D32: Financial Reporting Order
D33: Fines
D34: Forfeiture Order
D35: Guardianship and Hospital Orders
D36: Newton Hearings
D37: Offences Taken into Consideration
D38: Parenting Order
D39: Parents and Guardians, Liability and Responsibility
D40: Penalty Points for Driving Offences
D41: Prescribed Minimum Sentences
D42: Pre-Sentence Drug Testing
D43: Pre-Sentence Reports
D44: Previous Convictions
D45: Prosecution Costs
D46: Racially and Religiously Aggravated Crimes
D47: Referral Orders
D48: Remand to Hospital for Reports
D49: Remitting a Juvenile
D50: Reparation Order
D51: Restitution Order
D52: Restraining Order
D53: Return to Custody
D54: Sentencing Guidelines Issued by Sentencing Guidelines Council
D55: Sexual Offences Notification Requirements
D56: Sexual Offences Prevention Order
D57: Sexual Orientation or Disability
D58: Supervision Order
D59: Surcharge Order
D60: Suspended Sentences
D61: Time on Remand
D62: Youth Rehabilitation Order: Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008
Appendices
Appendix 1: Application for Costs against Convicted Defendants
Appendix 2: Bar Council Guidance: Court Appointed Legal Representatives
Appendix 3: Penalty Notices for Disorder
Appendix 4: Criminal Procedure Rules 2010: Rule 1 (The Overriding Objective) and Rule 3 (Case Management)
Appendix 5: Relevant Offences for the Purposes of Special Measures Direction
Appendix 6: Fraud Guideline

Review(s) from previous edition
 
"Easy to read and not only extremely useful for advocates but could be a vital quick reference document for legal advisors and magistrates - John Thornhill JP, The Magistrate

"An excellent book...it covers virtually every area of law and procedure you may encounter in the magistrates' court. Even better - it is handbag sized!" - Natasha McDermott, Managing Partner, Carters Solicitors

"The only book to contain all the material you need in such an easily portable volume...There can be no better person to produce this work." - Senior District Judge (Chief Magistrate)

"I shall want rarely to be without it. As a Resident Judge I am regularly dealing with the interface between the Crown Court and the Magistrates' Court. I often find myself groping for information about the regular practice and procedure in the Magistrates' Court. It has until now been difficult to find help consistently in any one place . . . Thank you for this gem of a book" - HHJ Peter Collier

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of The Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 2012 on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Police Manuals 2012: Four Volume Set
Blackstone's Police Manuals
Edition: 14th
Format: Paperback
Authors: Glenn Hutton, Gavin McKinnon, Simon Cooper, Michael Orme, and David Johnston
ISBN: 978-0-19-969603-1
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £69.99 the set of 4
Publication Date: 18th August 2011
 

Publisher's Title Information

The only official study guide for the OSPRE Part 1 Police Promotion Examinations endorsed by the National Policing Improvements Agency
Study with the books from which the exams are set - if it's not in the book, it won't be in the exam
Fully updated to reflect latest case law and legislation - do not risk being out of date with your revision

New for this year - the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Policing and Crime Act 2009; and six new chapters covering the full PACE Codes of Practice A to G
Written by experienced law specialists and professionally reviewed by the NPIA, giving you confidence in the products
Blackstone's Police Manuals, available in four volumes, are the leading police reference texts in the UK. Written in consultation with police forces across England and Wales, the Manuals are the only study guides endorsed by the National Policing Improvement Agency for OSPRE Part 1 Promotion Examinations.
 
The four volumes cover all aspects of criminal law and procedure from a police officer's perspective, in line with the new OSPRE syllabus. Straightforward and accessible, the Manuals offer a logical progression through the material and are extensively cross-referenced to provide a deeper understanding and more complete perspective of police duties. For complex or commonly misunderstood areas, there are handy Keynote boxes, which point to relevant case law or provide an example of how material is used in a practical sense, helping candidates to assimilate the information better and establish the connections between legislation and police procedure. The 2012 edition has been updated to incorporate all recent legislative developments and case law, including coverage of the Equality Act 2010, the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, and the Policing and Crime Act 2009. The 2012 edition also contains six new chapters incorporating the full PACE Codes of Practice A to G, with helpful Keynotes to guide candidates through the legislation.
 
Blackstone's Police Manuals continue to be the most accessible, relevant, and focussed revision materials for Promotion Examinations. Widely used by trainers as well as police officers going for promotion, their breadth and scope also make them an invaluable resource for anyone involved in police and criminal law.
 
Blackstone's Police Manuals are also available as an online service offering fast desktop access to the complete text of the four Manuals.

Readership:

Police officers taking the sergeants and inspectors OSPRE promotion examination. Also, IPLDP student officers; qualified and serving police officers and police trainers.

Contents

Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 1: Crime 2012
1.1: State of Mind
1.2: Criminal Conduct
1.3: Incomplete Offences and Police Investigations
1.4: General Defences
1.5: Homicide
1.6: Misuse of Drugs
1.7: Firearms and Gun Crime
1.8: Non-Fatal Offences Against the Person
1.9: Miscellaneous Offences Against the Person
1.10: Sexual Offences
1.11: Control of Sex Offenders
1.12: Child Protection
1.13: Theft and Related Offences
1.14: Fraud
1.15: Criminal Damage
1.16: Offences Against the Administration of Justice and Public Interest
1.17: Offences Arising from Immigration, Asylum and People Exploitation
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 2: Evidence and Procedure 2012
2.1: Sources of Law
2.2: The Courts
2.3: Instituting Criminal Proceedings
2.4: Bail
2.5: Court Procedure and Witnesses
2.6: Youth Justice, Crime and Disorder
2.7: Evidence
2.8: Exclusion of Admissible Evidence
2.9: Disclosure of Evidence
2.10: Custody Officer's Duties
2.11: Identification
2.12: Interviews
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 3: Road Policing 2012
3.1: Classifications and Concepts
3.2: Offences Involving Standards of Driving
3.3: Notices of Intended Prosecutions
3.4: Accidents and Collisions
3.5: Drink, Drugs and Driving
3.6: Insurance
3.7: Protection of Drivers and Passengers
3.8: Highways and Safety Measures
3.9: Other Measures Affecting Safety
3.10: Construction and Use
3.11: Driver Licensing
3.12: Fixed Penalty System
3.13: Forgery and Falsification of Documents
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 4: General Police Duties 2012
4.1: Police
4.2: Complaints and Misconduct
4.3: Unsatisfactory Performance and Attendance
4.4: Extending the Police Family
4.5: Human Rights
4.6: Policing Powers and Powers of Arrest
4.7: Stop and Search
4.8: Entry, Search and Seizure
4.9: Harrasment, Hostility, and Anti-social Behaviour
4.10: Offences Involving Communications
4.11: Terrorism and Associated Offences
4.12: Public Disorder
4.13: Sporting Events
4.14: Weapons
4.15: Civil Disputes
4.16: Offences relating to Land and Premises
4.17: Licensing and Offences relating to Alcohol, and Gambling
4.18: Offences and Powers relating to Information
4.19: Diversity, Discrimination and Equality

Authors

Glenn Hutton, Private assessment and examination consultant, Gavin McKinnon, Simon Cooper, Senior Lecturer, Criminal Law and Evidence, at the University of Salford, Michael Orme, Formerly Greater Manchester Police, and David Johnston, Barrister and Superintendent in the Metropolitan Police Service

Paul Connor LLB is a Police Training Consultant and is a member of the ICIDP Curriculum Review Group. He has previously been involved in training activities with the ICIDP and NIE. Paul is also the consultant editor for the Blackstone's Police Manuals and author of Blackstone's Police Investigators' Workbook, Blackstone's Police Investigators' Q&As and Blackstone's Sergeants' Mock Examination Paper.

Glenn Hutton BA, MPhil, FCIPD is a Director of Psychometric Technology Limited which designs and publishes psychological tests and provides selection and assessment services. Formerly a Superintendent in North Yorkshire Police, he also worked as Head of NPT Examinations and Assessment, Head of Training in North Yorkshire and as both Course Director and Director of Studies at the Police Staff College, Bramshill.

Gavin McKinnon LLB, LLM, MSc, MCIPR is Chief Superintendent and Director of Corporate and Public Affairs at the National Policing Improvement Agency with responsibility for marketing and communications, legal services, corporate governance, policy, and equality and diversity. He was formerly an officer in the RUC/PSNI, and Deputy Director of the Home Office Police Reform Unit.

Simon Cooper MA, LLB is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Salford where he teaches Criminal Law and Evidence. Previously, he was a serving police officer with the Greater Manchester Police from 1976 to 1983, the majority of this time being spent on road traffic duties. He has published widely in numerous legal journals and is the co-author of Elliot & Wood's Cases and Material on Criminal Law. With Michael Orme, he has written Road Traffic Law, part of the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series.

Michael Orme BA retired from Greater Manchester Police in November 2004 having completed 30 years police service. He specialised in Road Traffic Policing in his career, having spent over 25 years on Road Policing Units both on inner city and territoral divisions.

David Johnston LLB, LLM is a barrister and Superintendent in the Metropolitan Police Service. Formerly a member of the NPT Examinations and Assessment team, he is an OSPRE Assessor and previously worked as a legal researcher for the Home Office in Harrogate.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of The Blackstone Police Manuals on the Oxford University website


Covert Policing
Law and Practice
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardback
Author: Simon McKay
ISBN: 978-0-19-928910-3
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £95
Publication Date: 24th Feb 2011
 

Publisher's Title Information

Provides a comprehensive guide to the Police Act 1997 and RIPA 2000, clearly broken down into separate chapters for each main aspect of the legislation
Clearly explains the interpretation of provisions as set out by the courts and identifies the key principles emanating from cases
Highlights the particular vulnerabilities and anomalies of surveillance and covert policing work to assist practitioners in developing and testing interpretative arguments
Covert Policing: Law & Practice offers a comprehensive review of the law governing covert policing activities, undertaken by law enforcement and other public authorities. It sets out the framework within which covert policing operations should be planned and managed to enable practitioners working for either the defence or prosecution to consider the legality and propriety of evidence obtained in cases where covert policing resources have been deployed, including applications for Public Interest Immunity.
 
The text places considerable emphasis on the need for a proper methodology of approach to RIPA 2000 and other legislation affecting this area, including the 2010 revised Codes of Practice on Covert Surveillance and Property Interference and the Use and Conduct of Covert Human Intelligence Sources. It examines the statutory and procedural requirements relating to covert policing deployments, from the interception of communications and directed and intrusive surveillance resources, through to the use and conduct of covert human intelligence sources in operations as diverse as counter-terrorism and serious crime to minor test purchase cases.
 
Covert Policing: Law & Practice critically assesses the law in this area and identifies vulnerabilities and anomalies which practitioners need to develop and use during the course of legal arguments. It will also examine the oversight mechanisms that exist to protect those subjected to invasions of privacy without the proper criminal or civil processes.
 
The law in this area is notoriously complicated and opaque. Covert Policing: Law & Practice seeks to unravel the complexities of RIPA and its relationship with other legislative provisions in order to assist those working in the area. Written in a way that seeks to highlight the effect of the legislation and the principles emanating out of the case law, this book is an essential resource for practitioners engaged in cases where covert policing issues are likely to arise. It will also be of assistance to those working ofr the police and other public authorities authorised under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 to carry out surveillance and other covert activities. SEE http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/23/contents

Contents

1: An Introduction to Covert Policing Law and Practice: Exploring and Applying Methodology of Approach
Introduction
The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000
The Need for Methodology of Approach
Evolving an Approach
Summary and Structure of the Book
2: Privacy, Proportionality and Other Human Rights Principles
Introduction
The Human Rights Context
Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights
The Evolution of Privacy Law in the United Kingdom
Proportionality
Other Human Rights Principles
Conclusion
3: Interception of Communications
Interception of Communications in Context
The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 and the Interception of Communications
European Convention on Human Rights
The Future of the Admissibility of Intercept
4: The Acquisition and Disclosure of Communications Data
Introduction
The Code of Practice
Statutory Provisions
Matters Arising out of the Code of Practice
5: Surveillance
Introduction
Surveillance Law: Statutory Sources
Statutory Definitions of Surveillance
Applications for Authorization: Requirements
Other Matters Relating to Authorization
Overt Photography, CCTV, and Related Issues
Other Practical Issues
The Future of Surveillance
6: Property Interference
Introduction
The Legislative Matrix
7: Covert Human Intelligence Sources
Introduction
Defining Covery Human Intelligence Sources
Authorization
Vulnerable and Juvenile Sources
Inter-relationship with Use and Conduct of Covert Human Intelligence Sources and Other Covert Policing Resources
Participation in Criminality
Rewards: Reduction in Sentence (Texts) and Payments
Cell Confessions
Disclosure in Criminal Proceedings
Entrapment
Civil Liability
8: The Investigation of Data Protected by Encryption
Introduction
Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, Part III
Future Issues
9: Trial Issues
Introduction
Admissibility
The Rights Engaged
Protecting Covert Sources, Techniques, and Methodology
Future Issues
10: Private and Non-regulated Surveillance
Introduction
Definition and Scope of the Problem
Compliance: the Legal Framework
Admissibility of Private Surveillance
Strasbourg's Approach to Private Surveillance
Conclusion and Future Challenges
11: Oversight
Introduction
Interception of Communications Commissioner
Intelligence Services Commissioner
Investigatory Powers Commissioner for Northern Ireland
Chief Surveillance Commissioner
The Investigatory Powers Tribunal
Criticisms of the Current Regime
Conclusions
The author
Simon McKay, Solicitor Advocate and Senior Partner, McKay Law, Solicitors & Advocates

Reviews to date

"This is certainly not the only book available that discusses the wider implications of RIPA, but it is the most up to date and the best." - CrimeLine

Review

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (c.23) (RIPA) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom regulating the powers of public bodies to carry out surveillance and investigation, and covering the interception of communications. It was introduced to take account of technological change such as the growth of the Internet and strong encryption.

The Author correctly states that the evolution of covert policing law in the United Kingdom was greatly influenced by the enactment of the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) when it came into force fully. We think back to 1979, and the case of Malone v Commissioner of the Metropolis (No 2) 'telephone tapping' and Khan v The United Kingdom. Another case that springs to mind is Halford v The United Kingdom. The last case concerned allegations that the home and office telephone calls of Alison Halford, who was then Assistant Chief Constable of Merseyside Police, had been intercepted.

This book takes a very profound look at the subject and seeks to analyse the law and interpret it. Reforms are suggested that it is hoped will at least be considered. Highly recommended for police libraries and those who practice in this specialist area.

Rob Jerrard

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Covert Policing - Law and Practice on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Custody Officers' Manual
Edition: 4th
Format: Paperback
Author: Huw Smart
ISBN: 978-0-19-959520-4
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £34.99
Publication Date: 17th Feb 2011
 

Publisher's Title Information
 
Blackstone's Custody Officers' Manual is the market-leading text for custody officers, containing everything you need to know to within a step by step guide to all stages of the custody procedure
Essential reading for both future and established custody officers, as well as inspectors, superintendents, training providers and others involved in the criminal justice system
Highlights common problem areas and offers practical guidance, with real life examples, flowcharts, and summary sections.

New to this edition
 
Fourth edition contains revised material on charging suspects, safer detention, and IPCC statistics and deaths in custody
Fully updated to cover all recent legislation, including the Counter Terrorism Act 2008 and the 2010 updates to the PACE Codes of Practice
The fourth edition of Blackstone's Custody Officer's Manual is an essential reference and training resource for all custody officers and trainers. All relevant legislation is presented in a clear and concise manner, together with analysis and explanation of the areas of the Codes of Practice that are most commonly misunderstood, to offer a comprehensive treatment of all elements of the custody officer's role.
 
Professionals involved in the criminal justice system will be acutely aware of the ever-changing legislation that governs the reception, treatment and welfare of people detained at police stations. This book interprets the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and accompanying Codes of Practice, and also covers detainees' entitlements, reviews and relevant times, identification and samples, as well as the extension of detention in terrorist cases.
 
The fourth edition contains revised material on charging suspects, safer detention, and IPCC statistics and deaths in custody, and is fully updated to cover all recent legislation, including the Counter Terrorism Act 2008 and the 2010 updates to the PACE Codes of Practice. Presented as a step by step guide to all stages of the custody procedure, Blackstone's Custody Officer's Manual highlights common problem areas and offers practical guidance using real life examples, flowcharts, and summary sections.
 

Readership:
 
Custody officers, detention officers, trainers, and trainees. Other police training departments, police studies students.

Contents
 
1: The Role of the Custody Officer

2: Detainees-Initial Action
3: Safer Detention
4: Clinical Treatment and Attention
5: Conditions of Detention
6: The Detainee's Entitlements
7: Vulnerable People and Appropriate Adults
8: Dealing with Property and Searching
9: Warrants
10: Reviews and Relevant Time
11: Extending Detention
12: Identification and Samples
13: Dealing with Legal Representatives
14: Charging Suspects
15: Continued Detention After Charge
16: Bail
17: Terrorism Act 2000 Detainees
18: Interviewing
Appendices
APPENDIX 1: Flow Charts
APPENDIX 2: Home Office Circulars

The Author

Huw Smart is a serving Chief Inspector and qualified police trainer for South Wales Police, with nearly 30 years experience in the police service. He is a part-time lecturer at the University of Glamorgan and is co-author of the Blackstone's Police Q&As series.

Preface
 
The original idea for the first edition of this book came about approximately eight years ago. At that time, there appeared to be very little assistance nationally for custody officers in terms of updated legislation or national policy. Even today, most custody officers receive excellent initial training, but how many forces provide regular updates or re-training relating to changes in legislation? This is compounded by the fact that, on average, two to three Acts of Parliament a year have been introduced which have an impact on the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and the Codes of Practice.
 
So why this particular book? There are some excellent publications that deal with PACE, such as Zander's Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, the Blackstone's Police Manuals and Blackstone's Criminal Practice. I have tried to keep this book as practical as possible by using my experience as a serving police officer to assist other serving police officers who may have no-one to turn to for out-of-hours advice on custody-related matters. Readers will notice that my style of writing is not the same as in some classic law textbooks, a matter that has been commented on by some reviewers. I make no apologies for this, because I have tried to simplify the subject and provide plenty of practical operational solutions.
 
The main purpose of this book is to provide access in one place to all the legislation and procedures that affect custody officers. All custody officers should be provided with a copy of the Codes of Practice, but what use is this if they do not have access to the original Act, or the many updates that have been introduced since 1984? Inevitably, someone will read this book and consider that I have missed something out. This could be for two reasons. First, in the research and writing phases, I have tried to limit the book to matters relevant to an operational custody officer. Secondly, it's almost guaranteed that the moment this new edition is published, new legislation will be introduced that affects custody matters. If I have omitted something important, I am not averse to receiving feedback, so that future editions may be amended.
 
Finally, what qualifies me to write this particular book? I have been a serving police officer with South Wales Police for the past 28 years. I have experience of writing, being the co-author of the Blackstone's Police Q&A series, published by Oxford University Press. I am also a part-time lecturer at the University of Glamorgan South Wales. Most importantly, I spent two years performing the duties of a custody officer and six years as an operational inspector, providing full-time cover as a review officer. Currently, as an acting superintendent with operational responsibilities, I deal regularly with custody issues and 24-hour extensions.
 
I have researched opinions and case law for the legislation and procedure that appears to this hook. However, where none exists, I have included my own interpretation. For this reason, I strongly recommend that readers consult with their own force policy on issues that are in doubt.
 
Preface
 
The original idea for the first edition of this book came about approximately eight years ago. At that time, there appeared to be very little assistance nationally for custody officers in terms of updated legislation or national policy. Even today, most custody officers receive excellent initial training, but how many forces provide regular updates or re-training relating to changes in legislation? This is compounded by the fact that, on average, two to three Acts of Parliament a year have been introduced which have an impact on the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and the Codes of Practice.
 
So why this particular book? There are some excellent publications that deal with PACE, such as Zander's Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, the Blackstone's Police Manuals and Blackstone's Criminal Practice. I have tried to keep this book as practical as possible by using my experience as a serving police officer to assist other serving police officers who may have no-one to turn to for out-of-hours advice on custody-related matters. Readers will notice that my style of writing is not the same as in some classic law textbooks, a matter that has been commented on by some reviewers. I make no apologies for this, because I have tried to simplify the subject and provide plenty of practical operational solutions.
 
The main purpose of this book is to provide access in one place to all the legislation and procedures that affect custody officers. All custody officers should be provided with. a copy of the Codes of Practice, but what use is this if they do not have access to the original Act, or the many updates that have been introduced since 1984? Inevitably, someone will read this book and consider that I have missed something out. This could be for two reasons. First, in the research and writing phases, I have tried to limit the book to matters relevant to an operational custody officer. Secondly, it's almost guaranteed that the moment this new edition is published, new legislation will be introduced that affects custody matters. If I have omitted something important, I am not averse to receiving feedback, so that future editions may be amended.
 
Finally, what qualifies me to write this particular book? I have been a serving police officer with South Wales Police for the past 28 years. I have experience of writing, being the co-author of the Blackstone's Police Q&A series, published by Oxford University Press. I am also a part-time lecturer at the University of Glamorgan, South Wales. Most importantly, I spent two years performing the duties of a custody officer and SIX years as an operational inspector, providing full-time cover as a review officer. Currently, as an acting superintendent with operational responsibilities, I deal regularly 'i.Y1th custody issues and 24-hour extensions.
 
I have researched opinions and case law for the legislation and procedure that appears a this hook. However, where none exists, I have included my own interpretation. t this reason, i strongly recommend that readers consult with their own force policy.
 
Huw Smart

Review
 
In his preface to the first edition author said, 'The original idea for this book came about approximately two years ago. (Now 8 years ago). He said, there appeared to be very little assistance nationally for custody officers in terms of updated legislation or national policy. On the one hand, some forces provide excellent initial training for custody officers before they are appointed; on the other hand, some forces provide no training whatsoever.'
 
He writes that even today, most Custody Offices receive excellent initial training, but how many Forces provide regular updates or re-training for changes to legislation? He correctly points out this is compounded by the fact, that on average, 2-3 Acts of Parliament a year are introduced, which have an impact on the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and the Codes of Practice.
 
As I said in my previous review the author compares his title with others.
 
The author refers us to Zander, Blackstone's Police Manuals and, Blackstone's Criminal Practice, but makes no mention of an excellent publication which has always been available, namely, 'Butterworth's Police and Criminal Evidence Cases', which is loose-leaf, an idea which I think should be adopted by Oxford. Nor does he mention Butterworth's Police Law, a title obtained by Oxford and in its 12th edition, 2011. Sadly Jack English, one of the Authors has just passed away.

The author makes particular mention to his style of writing. It is not as he says, 'as in some classic law textbooks'. I am glad he makes no apology because a busy Custody Sergeant needs simplicity as far as is possible in such matters. I particularly like the blank pages, 'space for notes' - I would have made good use of them. There are some excellent flow-charts and case-studies.
 
The book itself is up-to-date as one would expect and covers all of the PACE aspects of a Custody Officer and Review Officer's duties very fully with good explanations and case studies.It is not afraid to discuss controversial points where it feels the need to, e.g. on p.220-221 S. 128(8) of the Magistrates' Court Act 1980 (three day Lie-down) is considered. Who reviews when a person is brought back to the station, has he/she been charged, or in custody for an offence for which he/she has not been charged?
 
The author notes that neither Section 128(8) Magistrates Courts Act 1980 nor Notes for Guidance 15b are clear on the point and the author advises that Custody Officers check their own Force Orders procedure, however he opts to suggest that reviews are conducted by Inspectors. I agree. You are encouraged to consider local procedures and given space for your own notes.
 
The author's qualification for writing this book are given in the Preface and since this is now the fourth Edition and he is an Acting Superintendent they continue to improve.
 
Because Force Orders are usually issued weekly in most forces, it must be said that the Custody Officer's first port of call must be there, however I am sure he would be well-advised to have a copy of this book as well.
 
Rob Jerrard

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Blackstone's Custody Officers' Manual 4th Edition on the Oxford University website


Police Law
Edition: 12th
Format: Paperback
Author: The late Jack English & Richard card
ISBN: 978-0-19-959482-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £36.99
Publication Date: 20th Jan 2011
 
Publisher's Title Information

Provides the most comprehensive and straightforward coverage of those areas of the law and legal procedures applicable to police officers
A highly accessible text which assumes no prior legal knowledge
Fully up-to-date with the latest legislation and case law including the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 and the Policing and Crime Act 2009
Clear and simple structure with extensive use of cross-referencing to ensure ease of use and readability
Accompanied by a free companion website containing quarterly updates

New to this edition

Includes a number of significant legislative updates, including the Bribery Act 2010, the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, the Counter-Terrorism Act 2008, and the Policing and Crime Act 2009
This edition includes a new chapter on offences against the administration of justice
Now in its twelfth edition, this well-respected and highly regarded book covers all areas of law and legal procedure which are of interest to police officers.
 
This edition has been fully revised and updated to include new legislation such as the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, the Counter-Terrorism Act 2008, and the Policing and Crime Act 2009. The book includes discussion of important new regulations under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, as well as updates on the law relating to stop and search, conditional cautions, fixed penalty notices, and major changes to the defences of murder, and liability for encouraging or assisting suicide. In addition, a new chapter on offences against the administration of justice has been included in this edition.
 
Comprehensive and easy to understand, Police Law is an indispensible everyday reference book for police officers, and is the only book covering all areas of police law. The book also provides a good source of information for members of the public who wish to refer to a legal text written in an accessible way. Police Law is accompanied by a useful companion website containing regular updates on changes in the law throughout the life of the print edition.
Readership: All police officers and police trainers, police authorities, professional development units, police libraries, the Serious and Organised Crime Agency, the Home Office, advice centres such as the Citizens Advice Bureaux, and police studies degree students and academics.

Contents

1: General Principles
2: Elements of Criminal Procedure
3: Police Powers
4: Police Questioning and the Rights of Suspects
5: Treatment, Charging and Bail of Detainees
6: Identification Methods
7: The Law of Criminal Evidence
8: The Police
9: Traffic: General Provisions
10: Use of Vehicles
11: Control of Vehicles
12: Public Service Vehicles
13: Goods Vehicles
14: Lights and Vehicles
15: Traffic Accidents
16: Driving Offences
17: Drinking or Drug-Taking and Driving
18: Children and Young Persons
19: Licensed Premises, Licensed Persons, Clubs, Places of Entertainment and Offences of Drunkenness
20: Betting, Gaming and Lotteries
21: Aliens
22: Animals, Birds and Plants
23: Game, Deer and Fish
24: Firearms and Weapons
25: Explosives
26: Railways
27: Nuisances, Collections, Vagrancy, Peddling and Scrap Metal
28: Non-Fatal Offences Against the Person
29: Disputes
30: Homicide and Related Offences
31: Public Order Offences other than Those Related to Sporting Events or Industrial Disputes
32: Public Order Offences Related to Sporting Events and Those Connected with Industrial Disputes
33: Terrorism Generally
34: Sexual Offences
35: Offences Relating to Prostitution, Obscenity and Indecent Photographs
36: Drugs
37: Theft and Related Offences, Robbery and Blackmail
38: Burglary
39: Offences of Fraud and Bribery
40: Handling Stolen Goods and Related Offences
41: Forgery and Counterfeiting
42: Criminal Damage
43: Offences against Administration of Justice
44: Preventive Justice


The Late Jack English, Formerly Assistant Chief Constable at Northumbria Police, and Director of the Central Planning and Instructor Training Unit, and Chief Examiner to the Police Promotion Examinations Board, and Richard Card, Formerly Professor of Law and Chairman of the School of Law at De Montfort University, Leicester
The late Jack English was former Assistant Chief Constable with Northumbria Police, Director of the Central Planning and Instructor Training Unit, and Chief Examiner to the Police Promotion Examinations Board. He authored a number of well-respected police titles and also wrote on summonses and charges for the Police Reviewing Company.
Richard Card is formerly Professor of Law and Chairman of the School of Law at De Montfort University, Leicester. He has written and lectured extensively in a number of areas of law, particularly criminal law. He is the sole author of Card, Cross and Jones' Criminal Law, and has also written a range of other titles.


Review(s) from previous edition
'The wealth of Jack English's experience should amply state his suitability to produce a book on police law, a book which I have never been without since it replaced Moriarty, known to generations of police officers. Highly recommended.' -
Rob Jerrard, LLB LLM (London), formerly Book Reviews Editor & Legal Correspondent to Police Journal. Ex Inspector Legal Research Unit, Central Planning Instructor Training and Police Promotions Examinations Unit.

11th Edition (2009)
Oxford University Press
ISBN 978-0-19-955979-4
This book has set and maintained an outstanding standard which needs no explanation to those who practice and teach police law. The preface, among other things, describes its wide remit and the strategy used to achieve this purpose. This has stood the test of time for many years and continues to make an invaluable contribution towards promoting a clear and comprehensive understanding of the law and practice affecting operational policing. The preface also makes the point that the size of the book has become an issue due to the continuing enactment of legislation within this subject area (the previous edition numbered 1248 pages, plus the preface, summary of contents, list of contents, tables of primary and secondary legislation, and list of abbreviations). In response to this situation, the authors explain that they have omitted the chapter on betting, gaming and lotteries which was covered in previous editions. However, they have stated their intention to make this chapter available on the website of the Oxford University Press. Notwithstanding this interim measure, the book now numbers 1294 pages, plus the preface etc. which reflects the expanding rate at which police law continues to develop. The current volume is packed with essential information applicable to its intended readership and, as with previous editions, does so with great clarity and precision. As one would expect from the authors, the book has been skilfully updated to include not only recent changes in the law but also amendments which are in the pipeline.
Chapters 1 and 2 cover general principles relating to the criminal law as well as an overview of criminal procedure and the English legal system. This is particularly useful in view of the wide readership to which this book is directed. Many who consult this publication will be new to the study of the law and this constitutes a helpful introduction. Chapters 3, 4, 5 and 6 collectively explain the provisions regarding the exercise of police powers which include the following: stop and search; arrest; entry, search and seizure, the questioning and rights of suspects; the treatment, charging and bail of detainees; and identification methods. Chapter 7 provides an excellent account of the law of evidence which is followed by a very useful Chapter 8 which gives a clear insight into the police service itself and covers such matters as its organisation, jurisdiction and control.
Chapters 9 to 17 inclusive provide a very comprehensive coverage of road traffic issues. The particular brand of clarity and precision which pervades this book is especially welcome in this chapter due to the myriad of provisions that is characteristic of this aspect of the law. This is why there are specialist traffic officers within the police service as well as civilian enforcement officers! Chapter 19 deals with licensed premises, persons, clubs and places of entertainment, as well as offences of drunkenness. These areas of activity are the focus of increasing attention in view of concerns regarding alcohol-related offences. As mentioned above, the coverage of betting, gaming and lotteries is being transferred to the website of the Oxford University Press, therefore Chapter 20 announces this change in format. In addition, it makes the following point: “We have been told that, in view of the existence of Gaming Board inspectors and the increased participation in enforcement of local licensing authorities, the role of police officers is quite restricted.” The law relating to aliens is described in Chapter 21, and issues in respect of animals, birds and plants, as well as game laws, are covered in Chapters 22 and 23 respectively.
The complex rules governing firearms are unravelled in Chapter 24 and likewise in Chapter 25 which deals with explosives. Specific offences concerned with railways are included under Chapter 26, followed by an examination of the legal issues relating to pedlars, vagrancy and dealers in Chapter 27. Chapters 28 to 43 inclusive cover a wide range of issues under the substantive criminal law. These include the following: non-fatal offences against the person; disputes, homicide and abortion; public order offences related to sporting events and those connected with industrial disputes; terrorism generally; sexual offences; offences relating to prostitution, obscenity and indecent photographs; drugs, theft and related offences, robbery and blackmail; criminal damage; burglary; offences of fraud and corruption; handling stolen goods and related offences; forgery and counterfeiting; and preventive justice.
As stated in a review of the previous edition: “The only slight suggestion for improvement, is that whilst this book incorporates important decisions made in the courts within the text, this publication would be made near-perfect if the cases were actually cited by name. Although the existing style presents no significant problems, if specific cases were identified as such, this would strengthen the book's appeal to the student market and beyond. It would also make it an even more complete one-stop source of police law than it is already.” It is respectfully submitted that this suggestion still applies. However, this eleventh edition maintains the exemplary standard that has long been associated with the book and it remains outstanding in terms of its overall quality and value for money.
Leonard Jason-Lloyd
Visiting Fellow at the Midlands Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice, Loughborough University.

"Police Law is used by every Citizens Advice Bureau in England and Wales. It covers a range of problems faced by our clients and is invaluable when Citizens Advice Bureau advisers need to know, for example, the extent of police powers. The book is clearly set out and easy to read. - Citizens Advice Information Department
"It is a very easy to use comprehensive book. When giving advice to clients it is important for us as advisors to have access to information quickly and that it be clear and concise. This book does the job - what more can I say! " - Julie Plisner Haines, Citizens Advice Bureau, Essex
"This publication is an institution. It is very well known and has a fantastic reputation for doing exactly what it says on the tin. " - DCI Stephen Tunks, Avon & Somerset Police
"I would recommend this book to Law students and Student police officers to gain an in-depth knowledge of Police Law." - Kayleigh Rhodes, BSc Policing Student, Wolverhampton University


JACK ENGLISH OBE, QPM, MA

1931-2010
It is with considerable regret that I record the death of Jack English, General Editor of Butterworths Road Traffic Service, after an illness borne with Jack's usual fortitude and cheefulness.
Determined not to follow the family tradition and become a teacher, Jack became a police cadet at the age of 16. After his national service, mainly in Malaysia, Jack became a constable in the Northumberland constabulary. His antipathy to becoming a teacher did not last long. The early 60s saw his first period in the area of police training. Jack spent two years in Yorkshire training new recruits, something that would become his passion and vocation. He rose steadily through the ranks, achieving the highest-ever mark in his Inspectors promotion examination, and was promoted into the training department in 1965. 1968 saw another promotion, this time to Chief Inspector at Whitley Bay, the place at which he would settle and stay for the remainder of his life.
In 1971 he was seconded to the regional training centre at Dishforth in North Yorkshire and on completion of that secondment he took up the position as head of the Examinations Unit at Ryton on Dunsmore, near Coventry, which included promotion to Superintendent. A few years later the unit moved to Harrogate and the newly formed Central Planning Unit was formed with Jack at the head. Following regular success at the Central Planning Unit, Jack finally reached the rank of Assistant Chief Constable and in 1984 he was awarded the Queen's Police Medal for services to the police. Jack retired from the police service in 1985, in which year he was awarded the OBE.
But Jack was not all about work. He had a passion for the countryside. He was a keen game fisherman all his life, he loved walking in the country and spent many happy days in the hills near his beloved second home at Byrness in North Northumberland. He would spend many hours watching the hawks and falcons during the nesting season and deterring those who may have shown an inappropriate interest in their nesting sites.
Jack was a strong family man. He enjoyed 57 happy years of marriage to Jeanne and was proud of his two sons, Brian and Peter. Jack was devoted to his four grandchildren and delighted at the birth of Jack junior, his first great grandchild in October last year, which brought so much joy to his final months.
Jack's published work was not confined to Butterworths Road Traffic Series. He was also author of The Police Training Manual and Summonses and Charges. 25 years ago he and I co-authored the new Butterworths Police Law. That book, now known simply as Police Law, is currently in its eleventh edition. Over the last 25 years Jack and I worked closely together producing new editions. He was an utterly reliable colleague in every respect. Always entertaining, he was a joy to work with.
I am most grateful to Brian English for biographical detail.
Richard Card

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Police Law 12th Edition on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook & Workbook Pack 2011
Edition: 5th
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Robin Bryant, Sarah Bryant, Sofia Graça, Kevin Lawton-Barrett, Robert Underwood, Dominic Wood, Roy Murphy, and Bryn Caless
ISBN: 978-0-19-959642-3
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £54.99
Publication Date: 9th Dec 2010
 

Publisher's title Information
 
Offers a complete learning package for student police offers enrolled on the ILPDP
The Handbook and Workbook are linked closely to the updated National Occupational Standards for the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme (IPLDP), helping student police officers to learn and consolidate the key material
Designed specifically by practitioners to support student police officers and trainers during initial learning programmes
The Workbook provides realistic scenarios, multiple-choice questions and exercises based on key areas of the IPLDP syllabus including arrest and detention, case file construction, investigation skills, and forensic awareness
New to this edition
Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook 2011 is the most authoritative and widely-used book for student police officers, covering all the requirements for their initial training as well as for the new Diploma in Policing
The 2011 edition of the Handbook includes updates to key legislation including the Policing and Crime Act 2009, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, and revisions to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and the Confiscation of Alcohol (Young Persons) Act 1997
The Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook Pack 2011 combines the 2011 edition of the Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook with the new Blackstone's Student Police Officer Workbook.
 
A must-have for all student police officers and their trainers, the fifth edition of the Handbook ensures student police officers have the knowledge and understanding necessary to undertake independent patrol in a professional and competent manner.
 
Fully updated, the Handbook takes into account all recent legislation and developments, including the Policing and Crime Act 2009, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 and revisions to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 and the Confiscation of Alcohol (Young Persons) Act 1997.
 
Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook provides not only the background required for the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme (IPLDP) and the embedded National Occupational Standards (NOS), but is also the only book to cover all the knowledge requirements for the new Diploma in Policing. The book also makes reference to the IPLDP syllabus and covers key learning material such as the SOLAP, PAC, Learning Diary and PIP, as well as identifying the relationship between the Diploma in Policing and the NOS.
 
The book covers the key topics that every student police officer is required to know, including Stop, Search, and Entry, Managing People and Incidents in the Community, and Crime Scenes and Forensic Investigation. Each chapter leads the student through the topic, covering theory, discussion and practice while developing skills of analysis, problem solving and forms of reasoning. The chapters also contain frequent reference to the Diploma in Policing assessed units so that students can consolidate links between the subject area and the relevant unit.
 
Blackstone's Student Police Officer Workbook serves to complement the Handbook by offering a structured series of practical scenarios and exercises to improve students' understanding of the legislative and procedural content covered in the Handbook. The Workbook focuses on the key themes of the IPLDP syllabus such as communication skills, upholding human rights, forensic awareness, use of criminal intelligence, arrest and detention, and reporting and record keeping. These themes are explored through realistic scenarios, from drink and drug driving to shoplifting and internet sexual grooming, and are steeped in the authors' own operational experience of policing. The scenarios are structured to enable the reader, first, to understand fully the context of the incident and then to respond to questions set within the text. The Workbook also uses other features to test understanding such as multiple choice questions and 'gapped' statements.
 
The Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook Pack 2011 is a must for all student police officers and their trainers, foundation police studies students, and trainee specials.
Readership: The market for the Handbook will primarily be Student Police Officers undergoing their initial training. The book will also appeal to police trainers, PCSOs, foundation degree and honours degree police studies students and lecturers, and trainee specials.

Contents

Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook 2011
Blackstone's Student Police Officer Workbook

The Authors

Edited by Robin Bryant, Head of Department of Crime & Policing Studies and Academic Director, Thanet Campus, Canterbury Christ Church University, Sarah Bryant, Sofia Graça, Senior Lecturer and Programme Director, MSc in Policing, Canterbury Christ Church University, Kevin Lawton-Barrett, Senior Lecturer, Forensic Investigation, Canterbury Christ Church University, Robert Underwood, Former Police Officer and Lecturer in Policing Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Dominic Wood, Acting Head of Department, Crime & Policing Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Roy Murphy, former Detective, Kent Police, and Bryn Caless, former Head of HR, Kent Police

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of the book on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Counter-Terrorism Handbook
Edition: 2nd
Format: Paperback
Author: Andrew Staniforth and PNLD
Clive Walker and Stuart Osborne
ISBN: 978-0-19-959710-9
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £24.99
Publication Date: 25th Nov 2010
 

Publisher's Title Information

Offers a complete and accessible guide to the latest anti-terrorism laws, police powers, key strategies and practical advice, essential for the preparedness of all police officers on patrol
Designed specifically for all police officers and their counter-terrorism training needs
Covers the CONTEST 2 Counter-Terrorism strategy and security planning for the 2012 Olympic Games
Includes case studies and practical scenarios to illustrate the practical application of the legislation
Portable format ensures a quick and easy reference tool for patrol officers
Includes a one-page summary of each Proscribed Organisation listed under the Terrorism Act 2000
New to this edition
Coverage of the CONTEST 2 Counter-Terrorism strategy
Information on security planning for the 2012 Olympic Games
Increased coverage of the Counter-Terrorism Act 2008
Policing counter-terrorism forms a central strand of the 2009-2012 National Policing Plan, under which all police officers are expected to have a basic understanding of policing counter-terrorism and anti-terrorism legislation. Following European Court challenges concerning the use of terrorism stop and search powers and controversy in British courts of the legality of control orders, terrorism legislation continues to be tested in court as numerous convictions for a variety of terrorism related offences have taken place. In addition, new terrorist groups have been outlawed and the threat level was raised to 'severe' in January 2010 following the links of the Christmas Day Detroit airline bomber to UK universities. The second edition of the successful Blackstone's Counter-Terrorism Handbook has been fully updated to cover these developments and all new relevant legislation and case-law, as well as coverage of the CONTEST 2 Counter-Terrorism strategy and security planning for the 2012 Olympic Games.
 
The book is divided into two parts, offering readers both a helpful and informative history and context to policing counter-terrorism as well as all the relevant legislation, drawn from and linked to the government-sponsored Police National Legal Database. Part 1 of the Handbook provides readers with an operational framework and context to counter-terrorism. It also outlines the police counter-terrorism structure, the Government's CONTEST 2 strategy, and the roles and functions of key organizations (from M15 to HM Revenue & Excise). All this information is supplemented with case studies, practical scenarios and checklists, to illustrate the practical application of the legislation. Part 2 is devoted to counter-terrorism legislation itself, focussing primarily on police powers and procedures. These provisions are accompanied by explanatory notes, related case law and points to prove, ensuring that the information is easily comprehensible and digestible. Appendices featuring key legislative extracts and a comprehensive list of Proscribed Organisations make it easy for officers to locate the relevant information.
 
An essential resource for all patrol officers and PCSOs, this portable handbook is aimed specifically at the police and their counter-terrorism training needs.
Readership: Primary: all patrol officers and PCSOs, counter-terrorism officers, special branch investigators, counter-terrorism security advisers, and intelligence officers. Secondary: key organizations including the Serious Organised Crime Agency, the NPIA, force libraries, the Home Office, local authorities,the security services, and academic institutions offering postgraduate and foundation courses in terrorism studies, intelligence, policing, and police investigation.

Contents
Part 1 - An Introduction to Terrorism Andrew Staniforth:
1: Terrorism
2: Countering Terrorism
3: Policing Terrorism
Part 2 - Legislative and Procedural Content
4: Terrorist Activities
5: Terrorist Investigations
Appendix 1 - List of Proscribed Organisations
Appendix 2 - Profile of Proscribed Organisations
Appendix 3 - Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, Code of Practice H - Detention of terrorist suspects
Appendix 4 - Terrorism Act 2000 - Code of practice for audio recording of interviews
Appendix 5 - Code of Practice for authorised officers acting under Schedule 1 to the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001
Appendix 6 - Code of practice for examining officers under the Terrorism Act 2000
Appendix 7 - Officers' Powers and Duties

The Authors
Andrew Staniforth, North East Counter-Terrorism Unit, West Yorkshire Police, and PNLD , West Yorkshire Police Training School
Clive Walker, Professor of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leeds, and Stuart Osborne, Deputy Assistant Commissioner and Senior National Co-ordinator for Terrorist Investigations
Andrew Staniforth is an experienced counter-terrorism investigator who is responsible for designing and delivering training to counter-terrorism officers at one of the four specialist Counter-Terrorism Units in the UK. He has been commended for his work on counter-terrorism training by West Yorkshire Police and has also been involved in developing national exercises to examine the preparedness of both covert and overt police counter-terrorism assets.
The Police National Legal Database (PNLD) is a comprehensive legal database covering all legal information that police officers are required to know. It is housed within West Yorkshire Police Training School at Bishopsgarth in Wakefield and is the official online legal database used by the 43 police forces in England & Wales.
Professor Clive Walker is a specialist in terrorism, the law and police powers and is widely published on the subject.
Commander Stuart Osborne oversees the newly established Police National CT Network and is responsible for leading the operational and professional development of the CT network.

Reviews to Date

Review(s) from previous edition
 
"The publication is an important one for the police service and others. - Dr Colin Rogers, Principal Lecturer, Police Sciences, University of Glamorgan

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of the book on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Police Operational Handbook 2011: Law
Edition: 5th
Format: Flexicovers
Author: Edited by Police National Legal Database (PNLD)
Editor: Ian Bridges and Consultant Editor: Fraser Sampson
ISBN: 978-0-19-959519-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £23.99
Publication Date: 2nd Dec 2010
 

Publisher's Title Information

Portable, succinct reference for police officers on the beat
Covers over 100 different offences in the areas of general crime, assaults, drugs, sexual offences, public disorder, firearms, licensing and road traffic
Fully updated to cover all recent changes in legislation, including the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, the Policing and Crime Act 2009, and the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008
Includes important updates on PACE terrorism searches, penalty notices for disorder (PND's), drink banning orders, and changes to the law on murder and assisted suicide
Clearly lays out all the legislation you need on patrol along with points to prove, powers of arrest, related cases and practical considerations
Simple, standardised layout with a clear system of icons to guide you through complex areas of legislation
Written and endorsed by the Police National Legal Database (PNLD) - the premier online legal information source for all police officers and criminal justice professionals
Useful appendices at the back of the book contain religious dates and events, traffic data, a firearms ages chart, and handy contact and web addresses
Accompanied by a useful companion website, with quarterly updates to ensure content is up-to-date
New to this edition
Fully updated to cover all recent changes in legislation, including the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, the Policing and Crime Act 2009, and the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008
Includes important updates on PACE terrorism searches, penalty notices for disorder (PND's), drink banning orders, and changes to the law on murder and assisted suicide
Blackstone's Police Operational Handbook 2011 is designed specifically to meet the reference needs of officers while out on patrol. Written in a concise and accessible style, it covers a wide range of common offences and clearly explains and interprets the relevant legislation. At a glance, you can access everything you need to make a quick, informed decision in a host of everyday policing situations.
 
The fifth edition of this highly regarded and successful Handbook is fully updated to include all recent legislative developments and further changes to the law, including: the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, the Policing and Crime Act 2009, the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008, the Serious Organized Crime and Police Act 2005 and the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002. The book also includes information on PACE terrorism searches, changes to penalty notices for disorder (PND's), guidance on the new defences to murder, assisted suicide and changes to prostitution, plus further guidance in other areas of law from the new HO/MOJ Circulars, and the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006 on drink banning orders.
 
Whatever your role - police patrol officer, supervisor, student police officer, PCSO or Special Constable - this is an invaluable tool for operational personnel.

Contents

1: Introduction
2: Assaults and Violence
3: Crime: Dishonesty
4: Crime: General
5: Drugs
6: Sexual Offences and Assaults
7: Public Disorder/Nuisance
8: Firearms, Fireworks and Weapons
9: Licensing
10: Road Traffic
11: General: Patrol
12: Powers and Procedures
13: Patrol Matters and Guidance

The Author

Edited by Police National Legal Database (PNLD)
Editor: Ian Bridges, Legal Adviser, PNLD, and Consultant Editor: Fraser Sampson, Chief Executive, West Yorkshire Police Authority
The Police National Legal Database (PNLD) is a comprehensive legal database covering all legal information that police officers are required to know. It is housed within West Yorkshire Police Training School at Bishopsgarth in Wakefield and is the official online legal database used by the 43 police forces in England & Wales.
Ian Bridges LLB was a police officer for over 30 years and is senior legal adviser at the Police National Legal Database (PNLD).
Fraser Sampson LLB, LLM, MBA is the Chief Executive of the West Yorkshire Police Authority. Formerly Head of the National Police Training Examinations and Assesment Unit and of the Police Law Unit at national law firm Walker Morris, he is also an Associate Tutor at the University of Glamorgan. He has written and spoken widely in the news media on current Police Law issues and is a leading authority in this area.


More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of the book on the Oxford University website


PACE: A Practical Guide to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984
Blackstone's Practical Policing
Edition: 2nd
Format: Paperback
Authors: Paul Ozin, Heather Norton, and Perry Spivey
ISBN: 978-0-19-959524-2
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £29.99
Publication Date: 9th Dec 2010
 

Publisher's Title information

Explains the PACE Act 1984 and accompanying Codes of Practice in a clear, informative & accessible manner
Incorporates the latest updates to the Codes of Practice, including Codes E and F (April 2010), and features new case law throughout
Brings the legislation to life with a range of practical examples, checklists, flowcharts & guidance to illustrate the application of the Act and Codes
Includes the full text of the PACE Act 1984, as amended and the latest version of the Codes of Practice
Clearly laid out and easy to navigate with handy tabs to take you straight to the Act and Codes
New to this edition
Second edition provides further information dealing with the application of the Act for those outside the police charged with investigating offences, such as Revenue and Customs, the Armed Forces, security officers and Community Support Officers
Includes revised and expanded case studies and diagrams
This book provides practical guidance on what remains the single most important statutory basis for police duties and powers in England and Wales, the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and its Codes of Practice.
 
The second edition has been fully updated and includes revised and expanded case studies and diagrams. There is further information dealing with the application of the Act for those outside the police charged with investigating offences, such as Revenue and Customs, the Armed Forces, security officers and Community Support Officers. Amendments to the Codes of Practice, including Code A (December 2008), Codes B, C and D (January 2008), and Codes E and F (April 2010), are also included.
 
With the aid of check-lists, flow-charts and illustrative examples, this book gives excellent guidance on how the procedures and requirements of the Act apply to common every day scenarios facing police officers, as well as other persons charged with the investigation of offences. The appendices contain the full text of the Act, in addition to the latest version of the Codes of Practice.
 
This is an essential reference source which the busy police officer or legal practitioner cannot afford to be without.

Contents

1: Introduction
2: Powers to Stop and Search: Part I
3: Arrest: Part II
4: Detention: Part III
5: Treatment: Part IV
6: Identification: Part V, Code D
7: Interview: Part V, Code E
8: The Detention and Treatment of Vulnerable Suspects
9: Evidence: Part VIII
Appendix 1 - Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, as amended
Appendix 2 - PACE Codes of Practice

Review(s) from previous edition
 
"A comprehensive and well-structured publication for everyday users of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act - Detective Sergeant Nick Yellop, Metropolitan Police
"The advantage of this book, as compared with competitors, is that it's main focus is the application of the Act in everyday practice" - Julian Groomridge, Criminal Practitioner and Partner at Christian Khan Solicitors

Preface

In the preface to the first edition published in 2006, we asked the question why it should be thought necessary to have a book devoted to a single, and somewhat old, piece of legislation.

The answer to our rhetorical question remains as valid as it was four years ago; in the 25 years since the Police and Criminal Evidence Act came into force, and despite the 'hailstorm' of criminal legislation enacted over the last decade, PACE and its Codes of Conduct retain a central position of importance. Other statutes are hastily enacted only to be repealed bit by bit, but PACE always remains; it is constantly adapted, constantly evolving, but still the foundation stone upon which police powers are built, the guardian of suspects' rights and, in s 78, the source of what is arguably the single most important provision in criminal evidence and procedure.

Timing a second edition of this work has not been easy. Shortly after the publication of the first edition the then Labour government issued a public consultation paper in March 2007 as a precursor to what was intended to be a review of both the Act and the Codes. In August 2008, a PACE Review Board was established and a revised consultation paper issued; we waited to see what the results would be. More time went by, and it was not until March 2010 that the summary of responses was eventually published. Two months later, and the general election intervened returning a new Government with new priorities. It seems that we shall have to wait some time yet to see whether there will be a wholesale reform of PACE or further episodes of piecemeal amendments.

Some changes, actual and proposed, we do know, and those changes are reflected in this book. The Crime and Security Act 2010 - the last piece of legislation enacted by the outgoing Labour government - contains provisions to reduce the amount of information to be recorded when a Stop-and-Search takes place. The Coalition Home Secretary, Theresa May, also pledged in her first speech to the Police Federation after taking Office that she would reduce the 'burden' of the Stop-and-Search procedures, and that the Stop-and-Account form would be scrapped in its entirety.

The powers of the police to Stop and Search under s 44 of the Terrorism Act will also be reviewed as a result of the decision of the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Gillan and Quinton v United Kingdom [2010] ECHR 28. Pending that review, interim guidance has been issued by the Home Office which requires a search to be 'necessary'-+ - not merely 'expedient' - for the prevention of terrorism, and which restricts the use of s 44 powers to searches of vehicles rather than persons (for which officers will have to rely on s 43 which requires 'reasonable suspicion' that the person is a terrorist as a condition precedent to a search).

A further ECHR ruling that has affected PACE is that in S and Marper v UK [20081 ECHR 1581. In a response to that ruling (stating that the retention of fingerprints and DNA samples from those suspected but not convicted of offences was a breach of A.8), the Crime and Security Act 2010 imports into PACE a framework for the retention and destruction of biometric material (fingerprints and DNA samples or profiles) taken from 'individuals in the course of an investigation into a recordable offence. The Crime and Security Act further amends PACE to give the police further powers to take fingerprints and DNA samples from people who have been arrested, charged, or convicted in the UK, and from those convicted overseas of serious sexual and violent offences, and to require a person to attend a police station for the purpose of taking that data, with a power of arrest if they fail to comply.

Other new amendments to PACE since the first edition reflect the rapid change in technology available to the Police. There are provisions allowing the police to interview suspects using digital media, the introduction of live link bail, and proposals to amend Code D of the Codes of Conduct to institute new identification procedures to deal with ever more frequent occurrence of identification by recognition of a suspect on CCTV.

What further changes may take place between now and a third edition can perhaps only be guessed at, although the early indications are that the Government will seek to reduce bureaucracy and put more power back into the hands of the police; whether they succeed in this, and whether any such reforms improve policing or merely help to redress budget deficits remains to be seen.

As with the last edition, our intention in writing this book has been to produce a straightforward practical guide to the Act and Codes and to the common problems that can arise in day to day practice; the emphasis is very much on the practical rather than on the academic. Even so, as any author-practitioner knows, combining a busy practise with authorship is difficult if not impossible without help. We therefore gratefully acknowledge the invaluable research skills and assistance provided by Holly Webb, Elena Elia, and Paddy Duffy of 23 Essex Street, and of Morag Ofili and Abigail Bright, pupils at QEB Hollis Whiteman. Last, but by no means least, we extend our thanks to Lucy Alexander and all in the Police Law and Criminology team at OUP for their encouragement and inexhaustible patience.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of the book on the Oxford University website



"Internet Law Book Reviews", Copyright Rob Jerrard 2011