INTERNET LAW BOOK REVIEWS Provided by Rob Jerrard

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS (Police Books)



PACE: A Practical Guide to the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984

Series: Blackstone's Practical Policing Series

Edition: 1st

Authors: Paul Ozin, Heather Norton and Perry Spivey

ISBN-10: 0-19-928923-9
ISBN-13: 978-0-19-928923-3

Publishers: Oxford University Press

Price £24.95

Publication Date: 19 October 2006


Publisher’s Title Information

Explains the PACE Act 1984 and accompanying Codes of Practice in a clear, informative & accessible manner.

Brings the legislation to life with a range of flowcharts and practical case studies to illustrate the application of the Act and Codes.

Covers changes introduced by the new Codes of Conduct, the Criminal Justice Act 2003 and the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005.

Includes the full text of the PACE Act 1984, as amended and the latest version of the Codes of Practice which were implemented on 1st January 2006.

Clearly laid out and easy to navigate with handy tabs to take you straight to the Act and Codes

This book provides practical guidance on what remains the single most important statutory basis for police duties and powers in England and Wales, the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 and its Codes of Practice.
The law is explained in a clear, informative and accessible manner. With the aid of flow-charts and practical case studies, the book gives excellent guidance on how the procedures and requirements of the Act apply to common every day scenarios facing police officers and other persons charged with the investigation of offences. It alerts the reader to common problems and offers tips for dealing with them whilst also taking account of significant changes in this body of law introduced by the new Codes of Conduct and recent legislation including the Criminal Justice Act 2003 and the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005. Although the emphasis is on practical guidance, the relevant legal principles and the most important case law are digested and summarised.
The book includes the full text of the Act, as amended and the latest version of the Codes of Practice which were implemented on 1st January 2006.
This is an essential reference source which the busy police officer or legal practitioner cannot afford to be without.

Contents

Foreword by Baron Stevens of Kirkwhelpington, former Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis

1. Powers to Stop and Search: Part I

2. Powers of Entry, Search and Seizure: Part II

3. Arrest: Part III

4. Detention: Part IV

5. Treatment: Part V

6. Identification: Part V, Code D

7. Interviews: Part V, Code E

8. The Detention and Treatment of Vulnerable Suspects

9. Evidence: Part VIII

Appendix 1: Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, as amended (PACE)

Appendix 2: PACE Code of Practice for the Exercise by Police Officers of Statutory Powers of Stop and Search; Police Officers and Police Staff of Requirements to Record Public Encounters (Code A)

Appendix 3: PACE Code of Practice for Searches of Premises by Police Officers and the Seizure of Property Found by Police Officers on Persons or Premises (Code B)

Appendix 4: PACE Code of Practice for the Detention, treatment and Questioning of Persons by Police Officers (Code C)

Appendix 5: PACE Code of Practice for the Identification of Persons by Police Officers (Code D)

Appendix 6: PACE Code of Practice on Audio Recording Interviews with Suspects (Code E)

Appendix 7: PACE Code of Practice on Visual Recording with Sound of Interviews with Suspects (Code F)

Appendix 8: PACE Code of Practice for the Statutory Power of Arrest by Police Officers (Code G)

Reviews to date

'A comprehensive and well-structured publication for everyday users of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act' - Detective Sergeant Nick Yellop, Metropolitan Police

'The advantage of this book, as compared with competitors, is that it's main focus is the application of the Act in everyday practice' - Julian Groomridge, Criminal Practitioner and Partner at Christian Khan Solicitors



Policing A Diverse Society

Edition: 1st

Author: P Clements

ISBN-10: 0-19-929135-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-19-929135-9
Publishers: Oxford University Press

Price: £24.95 (paper)

Publication Date: 13 July 2006


Publishers Title Information


A one-stop practical resource covering all the major issues associated with policing diversity

First book in the area of diversity, aimed directly at the police

Supports the learning of the knowledge required by the National Occupational Standards (NOS) & Integrated Competency Framework (ICF)

Includes coverage of: the idea of community, the impact of terrorism on diversity, and developments in diversity since the Scarman report.

Contains a number of practical features to aid understanding, including: case studies, challenges to 'reflect on practice' and exercises.

The Series


The Blackstone's Practical Policing Series covers a range of topical subjects of vital importance in today's policing arena. Each practical guide contains clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation, accompanied by practical scenarios, illustrative diagrams and useful checklists. Packed with a wealth of information and advice, the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series ensures you have ready access to the tools you need to take on any policing challenge.
This exciting new text is a one-stop, practical resource covering all the major issues associated with policing a diverse society. Whilst taking due account of theoretical perspectives, this text supports and encourages the development of the relevant practical skills required to respond to diversity effectively.
Successful training and development of police officers will take account of the fact that policing is fundamentally about policing diversity. This text is a one-stop, practical resource covering all the major issues associated with policing diversity. Whilst taking due account of the theoretical perspectives on policing diversity, this text supports and encourages the development of the knowledge, understanding and skills and attitudes required to respond to diversity effectively.
Written in a very accessible, interactive style, the text directly supports the knowledge required by the National Occupational Standards (NOS) on diversity and the Integrated Competency Framework (ICF) and is suitable for student police officers working through the IPLDP, those studying for Foundation and other policing degrees, as well as anyone who wants a basic grounding in diversity issues.


Contents

1. Introduction

2. The Idea of Community

3. Law Relating to Diversity

4. International Comparisons

5. Responding to Diversity 1

6. Responding to Diversity 2

7. Key Concepts

8. Hard Issues

9. Business and Ethical Case

10. Scarman to Present

Appendices


Review

As a practitioner in the field of what has been variously known as ‘Race Relations’, Community and ‘Race Relations’, ‘Equal Opportunities’, ‘Race and Diversity’, and, latterly, ‘Diversity’, I came to this book with interest and the hope that it might clarify what it was that ‘Diversity’ meant.  I am afraid to say that I am a little disappointed.

On one hand, this is an accurate summary of much that is being said and done in the field now, against a limited historical background.  For the police officer or member of the extended police family who needs a single source of current thinking on the subject, this book is ideal.  I am more concerned with what it does not do.

Nothing that Dr Clements says in this book can be gainsaid in terms of his summary of the literature and the presentation of the various conflicting ways that diversity is being ‘done’.  How helpful that is, is another question. 

I would have liked to have seen a discussion of what is the problem that is supposedly being addressed in diversity practice and training.  It is interesting that in a book on this subject the words ‘racism’, ‘sexism’ and so on do not appear in the index as stand-alone subjects.  I find it difficult to understand how one can talk about diversity without first proposing what are the underlying theories and ideas that inform the exclusion and oppression of people on pheno-typical grounds.  There seems to be no acknowledgement that such exclusion and oppression takes place.  Diversity has been reduced to managing difference, which the author himself finds difficulty in defining. 

Dr Clements seems to avoid such words as racism in case, in the words of Erica Simmons, ‘it might upset somebody’.

I believe that so many questions go not only unanswered but unasked that the usefulness of this book in increasing an understanding of what needs to be done is limited.  If there are to be future editions I would urge the author to address at least some of the following questions:

What are ‘race’ and ‘racism’?  Why do we talk about ‘good’ race relations – is there such a thing as ‘bad’ race relations?  Why is the legislation to prevent race discrimination called the Race ‘Relations’ Act whilst all other laws are called (sex, religion, disability and so on)’Discrimination’ Acts or Regulations?  Where is the evidence that addressing prejudice leads to a decrease in discrimination?  Why is diversity addressed almost exclusively through training?  Who is determining what it is that needs to be trained for?  Who is given responsibility for conceptualising, operationalising and delivering training, i.e. the policy-practice nexus?    How are training initiatives institutionalised within the police?

As can be seen from this list (and it could be considerably longer) this book’s failings are not in what it says, rather in what it does not.

Jeremy Wheeler



Going To Court

Edition: 1st

Authors, editors, and contributors

Brian Fitzpatrick, Detective Sergeant, Specialist Crime Directorate (South London), Consultant Editor Mr Christopher Menzies, Senior Lecturer in Criminal Litigation, APU and former Police Trainer, and Consultant Editor Mr Rob Hunter, Barrister, St Johns Buildings, Manchester

ISBN: 0199284148

Publishers: Oxford University Press

Price: £27.95 (Paperback)

Publication date: 26 January 2006

Publisher’s Description

  • The only guide to court procedure and practice written specifically for police officers
  • Provides helpful information on a range of topics such as court procedures, giving evidence, case progression and preparing case files
  • Includes plenty of practical tips, court plans, flow-charts and diagrams
  • Explains the different features and processes of each relevant court - the Magistrate's Court, the Crown Court and the Coroner's Court
  • Covers likely future changes and developments
  • Accessible and clear layout

Contents

  • Glossary
  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 The Legal Professions
  • 3 The Magistrates' Court
  • 4 The Magistrates' Court: Sentencing and Bail
  • 5 The Youth Court
  • 6 Applications in the Magistrates' Court
  • 7 The Crown Court
  • 8 Crown Court: Preliminaries
  • 9 Crown Court: Trial by Jury
  • 10 Applications in the Crown Court
  • 11 Crown Court: Guilty Pleas and Sentencing
  • 12 The Coroner's Court
  • 13 Preparing for Court
  • 14 Trial Procedure
  • 15 Giving Evidence
  • App.1: Sample Search Warrants and Forms
  • Appendix 2: Useful References

This text is a practical and very useful guide for police officers of all ranks, designed to prepare them for attending court.

Most police officers will at some point be required to attend court and many officers attend on a regular basis. Going to Court is a unique text which demystifies and explains the court process. The book covers the main features and processes of the four relevant courts for police officers - the Magistrate's Court, the Crown Court, the Youth Court and the Coroner's Court. The book provides information on court procedures, giving evidence, case progression and case file preparation. Accessible and easy to use, there are many helpful flowcharts, diagrams, practical tips and court plans.

This book is a must have for all police officers who need advice and practical help with this often daunting experience. It will also be of use to fire service professionals who need to attend court.


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