"INTERNET LAW BOOK REVIEWS" Provided by Rob Jerrard LLB LLM (London)

Oxford University Press Books Reviewed in 2012

Crime Reduction Partnerships
A Practical Guide for Police Officers
Blackstone's Practical Policing
Edition: 2nd
Format: Paperback
Author: Colin Rogers
ISBN: 978-0-19-965926-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £34.99
Publication Date: 8th Nov 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The only practical guide to crime reduction partnerships written from a police officer's perspective
Combines the theory of the partnerships approach with many practical examples, including case studies and scenarios
Points to note boxes, summary sections, and flow charts help you consolidate your knowledge and apply the law in practice
Includes coverage of fear of crime, anti-social behaviour, and the National Intelligence Model
New to this edition
Includes new case studies focusing on terrorism and homegrown extremists, the Police Reform & Social Responsibility Act 2011, and the introduction of Police and Crime Commissioners
Explores the rise of the Neighbourhood Policing model and the increasing use of volunteers through Specials
This unique book discusses and explains the practical aspects of crime reduction partnerships from a police officer's perspective. Policing communities in the UK has changed dramatically over the last 20 years, with the partnership approach to crime reduction introducing new ideas and different ways of policing. The rise in terrorist activity and the realisation that many 'terrorists' come from within our own communities, in particular, has refocused much recent partnership work. Beginning with a discussion of what a crime reduction partnership is, this book describes how the theory can be put into practice and considers all relevant legislation and case law that has been introduced to deal with crime and disorder using the partnership approach.
 
The book uses a blend of theories and practical examples, including examples of best practice, information boxes, scenario boxes and key points to note. Flowcharts and summary sections are also included to help officers consolidate and apply their knowledge.
 
Written in an accessible and straightforward manner, this book is an essential best practice guide for police officers and other professionals involved in crime reduction activities.
 
The Blackstone's Practical Policing Series covers a range of topical subjects of vital importance in today's policing arena. Each practical guide contains clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation, accompanied by practical scenarios, illustrative diagrams and useful checklists. Packed with a wealth of information, Blackstone's Practical Policing ensures you have ready access to the tools you need to take on any policing challenge.

1: An Introduction to Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships
2: The Politics and Management of Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships
3: Anti-Social Behaviour
4: Community Problems and Crime
5: Theory into Practice
6: Policing Partnerships 1: Styles of Policing
7: Policing Partnerships 2: New Directions
8: Crime and Disorder Reduction Audits
9: Information and Consultation
10: Primary Legislation
References
Appendix - Typical Questionnaire Used in a Local Crime and Disorder Survey

The Authors

Colin Rogers, Reader in Police Science, University of Glamorgan
Dr Colin Rogers is currently a Reader in Police Science at the University of Glamorgan. A former police officer with 30 years service, he has been involved in the setting up of crime reduction partnerships and also involved in conducting Crime Audits for partnerships as part of the requirement of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. He has published articles in various journals on several aspects of policing and crime reduction.
Chief Inspector Keith Prosser is the Head of the Criminal Justice Unit for South Wales Police.

Review

The detection and prevention of crime must surely be the most practical way of reducing it, and, to that end, any book that helps in the fight is to be eagerly accepted with open arms. The 'Key Box', 'Scenario Box', 'Summing up', and 'Useful Websites' add to the chapters' value in combining to provide a very welcome second edition.

Rob Jerrard


Sentencing and Punishment
The Quest for Justice
Edition: Third Edition
Format: Paperback
Author: Susan Easton and Christine Piper
ISBN: 978-0-19-969353-5
Publishers:
Price: £26.99
Publication Date: 14th June 2012

Publisher's Title Information

By providing a comprehensive review of sentencing law, penal policy and penal justification this book provides students with a solid foundation of knowledge and clear understanding of sentencing and punishment in the UK
Reviews the practice of punishment in general and refers to human rights issues where appropriate, ensuring that students are fully aware of the significance of key UK and European legislation
Covers the key themes and topics studied on sentencing and punishment courses at undergraduate and postgraduate level, using case studies and discussion questions to encourage students to reinforce their knowledge by relating theory to practice
Accompanied by an online resource centre which provides students with updates, links to key sites and documents and guidance in answering the problem questions, enabling them to easily keep pace with developments and conduct self-assessment.
New to this edition

Sentencing Principles and Policies
1: Influences on penal policy
2: Structuring sentencing
3: 'Just desserts': seriousness and proportionality in sentencing
4: Utility and deterrence
5: Risk and danger
6: Making amends
7: Mitigating the sentence?
8: Treating children differently
Punishing Offenders
9: Justice in the modern prison
10: Equality and difference in punishment
11: Experiencing imprisonment
12: Just punishment in the community
13: Punishing young offenders
14: Sentencing and punishment in context

Reviews

"This third edition of Sentencing and Punishment provides an updated, succint and penetrating account of theoretical, legal and policy-related developments since the second edition as well as covering some of the ground of earlier editions. The change in government from Labour to a Coalition Government in 2010, the August 2011 riots, and the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill have all prompted vigorous debate about criminal justice, as has the continued high use of imprisonment. This is an informative, authoritative and lively account of sentencing and punishment - essential reading for anyone interested in the creation and delivery of justice. " - Loraine Gelsthorpe, Professor of Criminology & Criminal Justice, University of Cambridge
"Piper and Easton's sentencing text provides a timely and interesting addition to the scholarly literature on sentencing in England and Wales...an important resource for students in general criminal justice or penology courses with a component on sentencing." - The Howard League for Penal Reform Network Bulletin
Review(s) from previous edition

"A well-written and accessible text which provides excellent value for money. - The Student Law Journal, December 2005

"(A) stimulating account of the role of sentencing law and penal policy in England and Wales. " - The Student Law Journal, December 2005

"In addition to being an invaluable guide to those attempting to navigate the complex surface of current penal policy, the book should also stimulate fresh perspectives amongst those familiar with the topography of the current penal terrain. " - Howard Journal, 2006

The Authors

Susan Easton, Reader in Law, Brunel University, and Christine Piper, Professor of Law, Brunel University
Susan Easton is Reader in Law at Brunel Law School, a barrister and editor of the International Journal of Discrimination and the Law. She has previously lectured at the Universities of Sussex and Sheffield. She has a particular research interest in prisoners' rights and the experience of imprisonment.
Christine Piper is Professor of Law at Brunel Law School, and a member of the editorial board of Child and Family Law Quarterly. Her current research interests include issues in youth justice and the impact of punishment on families.

Review

The book; as is the case with many OUP publications; is supported by an online resource centre which provides students with updates, links to key sites and documents and guidance in answering the problem questions, enabling them to easily keep pace with developments and conduct self-assessment. See www.oxfordbooks.co.uk/orc/easton-piper3e/

Subsequent changes of government always mean new legislation and it is vital for students and practitioners alike to be fully informed. Only yesterday (6th Dec 2012) The Sentencing Guidelines Council initiated a move, see Sentencing for sexual offences - consultation launched

06 December 2012. The Sentencing Council has launched a consultation today on its proposals for how guidance for courts on sexual offences should be brought up to date. This shows how important an online Resource Centre can be to all concerned.

Rob Jerrard

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Sentencing and Punishment 3rd Edition on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 (book, digital, and all supplements)
Edition: 2013
Format: Hardback
Authors: Professor David Ormerod and The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper
ISBN: 978-0-19-965893-0 11
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £342.47 + VAT
Publication Date: October 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Your single point of reference for the criminal courts
The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper and David Ormerod lead a team of contributors whose courtroom expertise you can rely on
Clear, common-sense navigation coupled with a logical, intuitive structure - instant access to the information you need
New app for iPad and iPhone ensures that you have access to the latest developments in criminal law and procedure - wherever you are
Practical guidance on sentencing and procedure - your essential companion through every stage of every trial
Useful materials supplement contains the materials you need to access most frequently - includes the full updated text of the Criminal Procedure Rules and the Sentencing Guidelines
Supplements, quarterly updates, web updates, and email alerts keep you fully abreast of all developments
New to this edition
Coverage of all new developments including, the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act; Armed Forces Act; Protection of Freedoms Act; Legal Aid, Sentencing, and Punishment of Offenders Act
Led by The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper and David Ormerod, our team of authors has been hand-picked to ensure that you can trust our unique combination of authority and practicality. With a simultaneous supplement containing essential materials, you can rely on Blackstone's Criminal Practice to be your constant companion through every courtroom appearance.
 
This new edition has been meticulously revised to provide extensive coverage of all new legislation, case law, and Practice Directions. With supplements, free Quarterly Updates, and monthly web updates, you can trust Blackstone's Criminal Practice to provide reassurance on all the latest developments in criminal law and procedure.


MAIN VOLUME
PART A: GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF THE LAW
A1: Actus reus: the external elements of an offence
A2: Mens Rea
A3: General defences
A4: Parties to offences
A5: Inchoate offences
A6: Corporate Liability
A7: Human rights
A8: Territorial and extra-territorial jurisdiction
A9: European Union Law
PART B: OFFENCES
B1: Homicide and related offences
B2: Non-fatal offences against the person
B3: Sexual offences
B4: Theft, handling stolen goods and related offences
B5: Fraud, Blackmail and Deception
B6: Falsification, forgery and counterfeiting
B7: Company, commercial and insolvency offences
B8: Damage to property
B9: Offences affecting security
B10: Terrorism, piracy and hijacking
B11: Offences affecting public order
B12: Offences relating to weapons
B13: Offences affecting enjoyment of premises
B14: Offences against the administration of justice
B15: Corruption
B16: Revenue customs and social security offences
B17: Offences involving misuse of computers
B18: Offences involving writing, speech or publication
B19: Offences related to drugs
B20: Offences relating to dangerous dogs, hunting and animal welfare
B21: Offences relating to money laundering and the proceeds of criminal conduct
B22: Immigration offences
PART C: ROAD TRAFFIC OFFENCES
C1: Definitions and basic principles in road traffic cases
C2: Evidence and procedure in road traffic cases
C3: Offences relating to driving, triable on indictment
C4: Offences relating to documents, triable on indictment
C5: Drink-driving offences
C6: Summary traffic offences
C7: Sentencing
C8: Schedules 2 and 3 to the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988
PART D: PROCEDURE
D1: Powers of investigation
D2: The decision to prosecute and diversion
D3: Courts, parties and abuse of process
D4: Criminal procedure rules and case management
D5: Preliminary procedures in magistrates' courts
D6: Classification of offences and determining mode of trial
D7: Bail
D8: Assets recovery
D9: Disclosure
D10: Sending cases from the magistrates' court to the Crown Court
D11: The indictment
D12: Arraignment and pleas
D13: Juries
D14: Special measures and anonymity orders
D15: Trial on indictment: general matters and pre-trial procedure
D16: Trial on indictment: the prosecution case
D17: Trial on indictment: the defence case
D18: Trial on indictment: procedure between close of defence evidence and retirement of jury
D19: Trial on indictment: procedure relating to retirement of jury and verdict
D20: Trial on indictment: sentencing procedure
D21: Summary trial: general and preliminary matters
D22: Summary trial: the course of the trial
D23: Sentencing in the magistrates' court
D24: Trial of juveniles
D25: Civil behaviour orders: ASBOs, Closure Orders, CPOs, and VOOs
D26: Appeal to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) following trial on indictment
D27: Procedure on appeal to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division)
D28: Reference to the Court of Appeal (Criminal Division) following trial on indictment
D29: Challenging decisions of magistrates' courts and of the Crown Court in its appellate capacity
D30: Appeals to the House of Lords and the role of the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights
D31: Extradition
D32: Public funding
D33: Costs
PART E: SENTENCING
E1: Sentencing: general provisions
E2: Custodial sentences: general provisions
E3: Mandatory life sentences
E4: Custodial sentences for dangerous offenders under the Criminal Justice Act 2003
E5: Prescribed custodial sentences
E6: Suspended sentences under the Criminal Justice Act 2003
E7: Custodial sentences: detention and custody of offenders under 21
E8: Community Order under the Criminal Justice Act 2003
E9: Youth rehabilitation orders
E10: Referral order
E11: Reparation orders
E12: Absolute and conditional discharges
E13: Binding over
E14: Orders against parents
E15: Fines
E16: Compensation orders
E17: Restitution orders
E18: Deprivation and forfeiture orders
E19: Confiscation orders
E20: Recommendation for deportation
E21: Exclusions and disqualifications
E22: Mentally disordered offenders
E23: Notification requirements under the Sexual Offences Act 2003
E24: Rehabilitation of offenders
PART F: EVIDENCE
F1: General principles of evidence in criminal cases
F2: The discretion to exclude evidence; evidence unlawfully, improperly or unfairly obtained
F3: Burden and standard of proof and presumptions
F4: Competence and compellability of witnesses and oaths and affirmations
F5: Corroboration and Care Warnings
F6: Examination-in-chief
F7: Cross-examination and re-examination
F8: Documentary evidence and real evidence
F9: Public policy and privilege
F10: Opinion evidence
F11: Admissibility of previous verdicts
F12: Character evidence: evidence of bad character of accused
F13: Character evidence: admissibility of evidence of accused's good character
F14: Character evidence: evidence of bad character of persons other than the accused
F15: The rule against hearsay: general principles
F16: Exceptions to the rule against hearsay (excluding confessions)
F17: The rule against hearsay: confessions
F18: Evidence of identification
F19: Inferences from silence and the non-production of evidence
APPENDICES
Appendix 1 Codes of Practice under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984
Appendix 2 Attorney-General's Guidelines
Appendix 3 The CPS Code for Crown Prosecutors
Appendix 4 Disclosure
(SIMULTANEOUS) SUPPLEMENT 1
The Consolidated Criminal Practice Direction
The Criminal Procedure Rules 2012
Sentencing Guidelines


Reviews to Date

"Crime Practitioners with an iPad/iPhone have a new reason to add OUP's Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 to their library: the Digital option comes with the ability to use the publication in a new iPad/iPhone App - OUP LawReader" - Robert Bryan, One Paper Buildings Blog
"a really useful tool" - Robert Bryan, One Paper Buildings Blog
"It is the most comprehensive and easily accessible reference book on criminal law and practice and it enables me to do my job effectively and efficiently. I am in charge of the legal resources for the Force and if I was only allowed to order one book, this would be it!" - Patricia Wooding, Legislation Manager, Thames Valley Police


The Author

Professor David Ormerod, Barrister, Bencher of Middle Temple, Professor of Criminal Justice, Queen Mary, University of London, and The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper
Blackstone's Criminal Practice is written by a distinguished team of contributors, representing the accumulated experience of the academic world, the Bench, the Bar, and the solicitors' profession. The team is headed by The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper and Professor David Ormerod.

Contributors:

General Editors:
The Right Honourable Sir Anthony Hooper
Professor David Ormerod
 
Founding Editor:
HHJ Peter Murphy
 
Consultant Editor:
HHJ John Phillips CBE
 
Advisory Editorial Board:
Lord Justice Leveson
HHJ Robert Atherton
HHJ Peter Beaumont QC, the Recorder of London
HHJ Sally Cahill QC
HHJ Henry Globe QC
HHJ Jeffrey Pegden QC
HHJ Richard Marks QC
Howard Riddle, Senior District Judge (Chief Magistrate)
Michael Bowes QC, Outer Temple Chambers
Alison Levitt QC, Principal Legal Advisor, Crown Prosecution Service
Tim Owen QC, Matrix Chambers
David Perry QC, 6 King's Bench Walk Chambers
Robert Smith QC, 16 Park Place Chambers
Adrian Waterman QC, KBW Chambers
HH Eric Stockdale
 

Contributors:

Duncan Atkinson, Barrister, 6 King's Bench Walk
Alex Bailin QC, Barrister, Matrix Chambers
Diane Birch, LLB, JC Smith Professor of Law, University of Nottingham
Ed Cape, LLM, Solicitor, Professor of Criminal Law and Practice, University of the West of England, Bristol
HHJ Johannah Cutts QC, Aylesbury and Amersham Crown Courts
Anand Doobay, Partner, Peters & Peters
Rudi Fortson QC, Barrister, 25 Bedford Row; Visiting Professor of Law, Queen Mary University
Michael Hirst, LLB, LLM, Professor of Criminal Justice, Leicester De Montfort Law School
Laura C. H. Hoyano, Fellow and Tutor in Law, Wadham College, Oxford
Peter Hungerford-Welch, LLB, FHEA, Barrister, Assistant Dean (Professional Programmes), The City Law School, City University, London
Adrian Keane, LLB, Barrister, Professor of Law, The City Law School, City University, London
Andrew Keogh, LLB, LLM, Barrister and Solicitor
Michael Lerego QC, Recorder of the Crown Court, Professor, The College of Law
Richard McMahon QC, LLB, LLM, Deputy Bailiff of Guernsey
Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of the Department of Law and Professor of European Criminal Law, Queen Mary University of London
Tim Moloney QC, Barrister, Tooks Chambers
Stephen Parkinson, LLB, Solicitor, Partner and Head of Kingsley Napley's Criminal and Regulatory Group
Duncan Penny, Barrister, 6 King's Bench Walk
Amanda Pinto QC, MA, Barrister, 5 Paper Buildings
Edward Rees QC, Doughty Street Chambers, Honorary Fellow of Criminal Process at the University of Kent, standing member of the Law Commission Advisory Panel
HHJ Peter Rook QC, Central Criminal Court
Maya Sikand, Barrister, Garden Court Chambers
Richard D. Taylor, MA, LLM, Barrister, Professor of English Law, Lancashire Law School, University of Central Lancashire
Mark Topping, LLB, RD, Solicitor, Crown Advocate, Special Crime and Counter-Terrorism Division, Crown Prosecution Service
Martin Wasik, LLB, MA, FRSA, Barrister, Recorder of the Crown Court, Professor of Criminal Justice, Keele University

Preface to the 2013 Edition

In 2012, after eighteen months of relatively little statutory change affecting criminal practitioners, Parliament returned to producing characteristically long and complex criminal justice legislation with the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 and Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. This 23rd edition of Blackstone's Criminal Practice includes full coverage of the relevant aspects of both Acts, along with other important legislative changes this year including: the Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Act 2011, the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011, the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims (Amendment) Act 2012 and the Armed Forces Act 2011, as well as themany relevant statutory instruments, including those bringing into force the new regime for sending cases to trial, implementing the new PACE Codes and amending the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. In addition, throughout the text we have incorporated discussion of the latest changes to the Criminal Procedure Rules. The main work also explains the new Guidelines from the Sentencing Council which this year include Burglary, Drugs, Totality, Allocation, Taking other Offences into Consideration and Dangerous Dogs. As use of the Rules and Guidelines becomes an essential part of everyday trial practice, practitioners can be confident that these vital materials are always readily accessible, being reproduced in the supplement accompanying this main volume.

As one would expect, this edition also includes analysis by the expert team of contributors of all the important decisions from the appellate courts, including: the first interpretations of the partial defences to murder in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 (Dowds and Clinton); the much debated decision of the Supreme Court on joint enterprise (Gnango); St Regis Paper Company Ltd on corporate liability; the definitive guidance in S on assisting and encouraging under the Serious Crime Act 2007; Assange on extradition; Kayani on kidnapping and child abduction; Vinall on theft and robbery; A-G v Dallas on contempt by jurors; MB on unfitness to plead; Malcolm on the limits of judicial comment; R (Raeside) v Luton Crown Court on custody time limits; Howarth v Metropolitan Police Commissioner on stop and search powers; Gale v SOCA on confiscation orders; Hall on sentencing in historic sexual abuse; Blackshaw on sentencing in relation to offences in the riots of 2011, Rollings on sentencing for firearms offences; Randhawa on sentencing in MTIC; Sardar on special measures; Enrieu on good character; Al-Khawaja and Tahery v UK, Newell and Chinn on hearsay evidence; Hookway on the admission of DNA evidence.

The team at Oxford University Press (Fiona Sinclair, Stacey Penny, Eleanor Walter, and Jodi Roberts), led skilfully by Roxanne Selby, have worked with characteristic efficiency. We are grateful to them not only for ensuring that the final product is of the highest quality, but for their continued commitment to further development of Blackstone's year on year. Following the huge success of the eBook format last year, Blackstone's is once again available in electronic as well as print format.

Laurence Eastham, our editorial co-ordinator, once again achieved the remarkable feat of maintaining the exceptionally high standards for which Blackstone's is renowned while meetingsdaunting deadlines without wavering. We acknowledge our substantial thanks to him. His energy and enthusiasm remain an inspiration to us and to the team of contributing authors who have been admirably rigorous in their updating of the material for this main work as well as that in the cumulative supplements throughout the year.

As noted, this main work is published with a simultaneous supplement (Supplement 1) containing the Criminal Procedure Rules, the Consolidated Criminal Practice Direction and the Sentencing Guidelines. Readers can choose to subscribe to the two further cumulative supplements to be published in spring and summer. In addition, readers can sign up to a free Quarterly Update and free monthly online updating service ensuring that Blackstone's users are able to rely with confidence on the accuracy of the content throughout the year.
We welcome constructive comments and suggestions from readers. These assist us in providing a publication that meets the needs of the users. Please continue to offer your feedback via the web site at www.oup.com/blackstones/criminal. Alternatively, you can send us your comments by email at Blackstonescriminal@oup.com

Sir Anthony Hooper retired as Lord Justice of Appeal on 31 July 2012 but will continue in the role as Editor-in-Chief. David Ormerod is the Criminal Law Commissioner for England and Wales, but nothing in this work should be taken as representing the views of the Law Commission unless expressly stated to do so.

We believe that the edition remains true to the objectives Blackstone's Criminal Practice espoused from the outset, striving for an authoritative, comprehensive and accessible manual for all criminal practitioners.
We have endeavoured to state the law as at 1 August 2012.
Rt Hon Sir Anthony Hooper
Professor David Ormerod

First Supplement

This supplement is the first of three cumulative updating supplements to Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013.

This supplement contains the complete text of the Criminal Procedure Rules 2012, the Consolidated Criminal Practice Direction, and the Sentencing Guidelines as at 1 August 2012. David Ormerod is now the Criminal Law Commissioner for England and Wales, but nothing in this work should be taken as representing the views of the Law Commission unless expressly stated to do so.

Please visit the Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 companion website at www.oup.com/blackstones/criminalfor free online monthly updates, and an updated version of the Criminal Practice Rules 2012, taking in any amendments to the rules in the course of the practice year. You may also register to receive the Blackstone's Criminal Practice Quarterly Update, a free quarterly newsletter. If you have any queries, please contact Blackstonescriminal@oup.com.}

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 on the Oxford University website


A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure
Edition: 14th
Format: Paperback
Author: John Sprack
ISBN: 978-0-19-965195-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £49.99
Publication Date: 6th September 2012
 

Publisher's Title Information
 
Provides a comprehensive and accessible guide to the main contours of criminal procedure and sentencing
Takes a pragmatic approach to criminal procedure, addressing points likely to arise in day-to-day practice
Features an authoritative description of how courts apply the law
Extremely user-friendly and easy to navigate, lucidly written and clearly set out, with practical checklists, flowcharts, and examples
New to this edition
Considers changes resulting from the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act, especially in relation to sentencing and legal aid
Discussion of significant new cases on abuse of process (Warren, Ahmed, and F), dangerous offenders (Beesley), and joinder of defendents and counts (Miah and Ferrel)
Offers explanation and commentary on new Sentencing Guidelines and changes to the PACE codes
Now in its fourteenth edition, A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure provides a complete guide to the criminal process in England and Wales. It explains what happens before the accused appears in court, the way in which prosecutions are commenced, funding by the criminal defence service, and bail. It describes proceedings in the magistrates' court, including summary trial and committal for sentence, as well as the way in which the youth court operates. Committal and transfer for trial are clearly explained and the process by which serious offences are sent direct to the Crown Court is also studied. Trial on indictment is discussed in detail, as are sentencing and appeals.
 
This new edition has been fully updated to incorporate recent developments in the field. In particular, attention is paid to the changes resulting from the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act, as well as to recent Sentencing Guidelines. Changes to the PACE codes are also considered in detail.
 
Very much a practical guide, this title makes frequent use of examples, flowcharts, and tables, and is specifically designed to assist the busy professional and student. A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure is an indispensable resource for those working in this field.
 
The A Practical Approach series is the perfect partner for practice work. Each title focuses on one field of the law and provides a comprehensive overview of the subject together with clear, practical advice and tips on issues likely to arise in practice. The books are also an excellent resource for those new to the law, where the expert overview and clear layout promote ease of understanding.
Readership: Primary market: Criminal practitioners at all levels, including pupils, trainee solicitors, and those in the first few years of practice, and students preparing for professional examinations such as the BPTC, LPC, and ILEX. Secondary: Academics and students of the criminal justice system at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Contents

THE CLIENT
INTRODUCTION
1: Setting the Scene
2: The Role of the Criminal Procedure Rules
3: Preliminaries to Court Appearance
4: Prosecutors
5: The Decision to Prosecute
THE MAGISTRATES' COURT
6: Magistrates and their Courts
7: Bail and Remands
8: Mode of Trial
9: Disclosure
10: Course of a Summary Trial
11: Trial of Juveniles
12: Committal for Sentence
13: Sending Cases to the Crown Court
TRIAL ON INDICTMENT
14: The Crown Court
15: The Indictment
16: Pre-Trial Proceedings
17: Pleas
18: The Jury
19: Judge-only Trials
20: The Course of the Trial
21: The Verdict
SENTENCING
22: Procedure before Sentencing
23: Determining the Sentence
24: Custodial Sentences
25: Sentences Other Than Custody
APPEALS AND ANCILLARY MATTERS
26: Appeals from the Crown Court
27: Appeals from the Magistrates' Court
28: Ancillary Financial Matters
29: Your Practice
Appendix 1- National Mode of Trial Guidelines
Appendix 2- Sample Brief
Appendix 3- Trial Procedure in Outline

The Author

John Sprack, Barrister; formerly Reader, Inns of Court Law School
John Sprack practised for a number of years as a barrister in the criminal courts. He taught Criminal Litigation at the Inns of Court School of Law (now City Law School) for 11 years, and was Director of its Bar Vocational Course and of the LLM in Criminal Litigation. He was one of the founding authors of Blackstone's Criminal Practice and now provides Continuous Professional Development courses for practising lawyers in Advocacy and Employment Law.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of A Practical Approach to Criminal Procedure 14th Edition 2012 on the Oxford University website


Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 2013
Edition: 2013
Format: Flexicover
Author: Andrew Keogh
ISBN: 978-0-19-965616-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £44.95
Publication Date: 06 September 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The bestselling complete guide to the magistrates' court
Andrew Keogh offers you a practical resource you can trust
Pocket-sized format is ideal for everyday use at court
Essential extracts from the Magistrates' Court Sentencing Guidelines
Cross-referencing to Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 guides you to in-depth commentary
New to this edition
Coverage of new sentencing guidelines on burglary, drugs, and dangerous dogs
Increased material on road traffic offences
Expanded coverage of extradition
This new edition of the bestselling Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook provides a complete practical guide for the busy magistrates' court advocate. Incorporating essential extracts from the Magistrates' Court Sentencing Guidelines, Andrew Keogh offers all you need in one trustworthy source.
 
Covering all the key aspects of magistrates' court practice, the book focuses on the areas most likely to arise at short notice requiring an instant response from the advocate, as well as on those offences most frequently experienced at court, such as public order, drugs, weapons, driving, criminal damage, and sexual offences.
 
Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 's easy-to-use pocket-sized format facilitates quick reading and instant decision-making. Tables, flow-charts, and a clear system of icons aid comprehension and speedy navigation. Cross-referencing to Blackstone's Criminal Practice 2013 provides you with easy access to in-depth commentary.

Contents

Part A Procedure and Evidence
A1: Abuse of Process
A2: Adjournments
A3: Admissibility and Exclusion of Evidence
A4: Advance Information
A5: Amending Charge
A6: Appeals and Reopening
A7: Bad Character
A8: Bail
A9: Binding Rulings
A10: Case Management
A11: Clerks Retiring with Justices
A12: Commencing Proceedings
A13: Constitution and Jurisdiction
A14: Committal, Sending, and Transfer for Trial
A15: Costs (Defendants)
A16: Court Appointed Legal Representatives
A17: Custody Time Limits
A18: Disclosure
A19: Evidence in Civil Cases
A20: Extradition
A21: Handcuffs Applications
A22: Hearsay
A23: Human Rights
A24: Identification Evidence
A25: Legal Aid
A26: Mental Disorder
A27: Misbehaviour at Court
A28: Mode of Trial, Allocation, and Plea Before Venue
A29: Presence of Defendant in Court
A30: Remand Periods
A31: Reporting Restrictions
A32: Special Measures and Vulnerable Witnesses
A33: Submission of No Case
A34: Transfer of Criminal Cases
A35: Video Links
A36: Warrants
A37: Witnesses, Issue of Summons or Warrant
Part B: Youth Court
B1: General Provisions
B2: Mode of Trial and Allocation
B3: Bail: Young Offenders
B4: Sentencing
Part C: Offences
C1: Animal Offences
C2: Anti-Social Behaviour Order, Breach of
C3: Bail, Failure to Surrender
C4: Communication Network Offences
C5: Criminal Damage
C6: Drugs
C7: Education Act
C8: Fail to Comply with Notification Requirements, Sex Offenders Register
C9: Immigration Offences
C10: Prison Offences
C11: Protective Order, Breach of
C12: Public Order
C13: Road Traffic Offences, Definitions
C14: Road Traffic Offences, Suitable for Fine/Discharge
C15: Sexual Offences
C16: Theft, Fraud, and Evasion
C17: Violence against the person
Part D: Sentencing
D1: Age of Offender
D2: Alteration of Sentence
D3: Anti-Social Behaviour Orders
D4: Banning Orders
D5: Bind Over
D6: Breach of Community Order
D7: Breach of Supervision Order
D8: Committal for Sentence
D9: Committal for Sentence: Dangerous Young Offender
D10: Community Orders and Sentences: General
D11: Community Punishment and Rehabilitation Orders
D12: Community Punishment Order
D13: Community Rehabilitation Order
D14: Compensation Order
D15: Conditional and Absolute Discharge
D16: Confiscation, Proceeds of Crime Act 2002
D17: Custodial Sentences
D18: Dangerous Offenders
D19: Deferment of Sentence
D20: Deportation, Automatic
D21: Deprivation Order
D22: Detention and Training Order
D23: Detention in Young Offender Institution
D24: Detention under Section 91 PCC(S)A 2000
D25: Discounts for Early Plea
D26: Disqualification from Driving
D27: Disqualification of Company Directors
D28: Drinking Banning Order
D29: Exclusion from Licensed Premises
D30: Exclusion Order
D31: Financial Circumstances Order
D32: Financial Reporting Order
D33: Fines
D34: Forfeiture Order
D35: Guardianship and Hospital Orders
D36: Newton Hearings
D37: Offences Taken into Consideration
D38: Parenting Order
D39: Parents and Guardians, Liability and Responsibility
D40: Penalty Points for Driving Offences
D41: Prescribed Minimum Sentences
D42: Pre-Sentence Drug Testing
D43: Pre-Sentence Reports
D44: Previous Convictions
D45: Prosecution Costs
D46: Racially and Religiously Aggravated Crimes
D47: Referral Orders
D48: Remand to Hospital for Reports
D49: Remitting a Juvenile
D50: Reparation Order
D51: Restitution Order
D52: Restraining Order
D53: Return to Custody
D54: Sentencing Guidelines Issued by Sentencing Council
D55: Sexual Offences Notification Requirements
D56: Sexual Offences Prevention Order
D57: Sexual Orientation or Disability
D58: Supervision Order
D59: Surcharge Order
D60: Suspended Sentences
D61: Time on Remand
D62: Youth Rehabilitation Order: Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008
Appendices
Appendix 1: Application for Costs Against Convicted Defendants
Appendix 2: Bar Council Guidance: Court Appointed Legal Representatives
Appendix 3: Penalty Notices for Disorder
Appendix 4: Criminal Procedure Rules 2011
Appendix 5: Relevant Offences for the Purposes of Special Measures Direction
Appendix 6: Fraud Guideline
Appendix 7: Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012
Appendix 8: Dangerous Dogs Sentencing Guideline

Review(s) from previous edition

"Easy to read and not only extremely useful for advocates but could be a vital quick reference document for legal advisors and magistrates - John Thornhill JP, The Magistrate
"An excellent book...it covers virtually every area of law and procedure you may encounter in the magistrates' court. Even better - it is handbag sized!" - Natasha McDermott, Managing Partner, Carters Solicitors
"The only book to contain all the material you need in such an easily portable volume...There can be no better person to produce this work." - Senior District Judge (Chief Magistrate) Howard Riddle
"I shall want rarely to be without it. As a Resident Judge I am regularly dealing with the interface between the Crown Court and the Magistrates' Court. I often find myself groping for information about the regular practice and procedure in the Magistrates' Court. It has until now been difficult to find help consistently in any one place . . . Thank you for this gem of a book" - HHJ Peter Collier QC

The Author

Andrew Keogh, Partner, Keogh Solicitors
Andrew Keogh is a criminal solicitor running his own firm specializing in criminal and regulatory work. He is the founder and editor of CrimeLine - a free weekly criminal law updater with over 18,000 subscribers. He has authored a number of books and is a contributor to OUP's Blackstone's Criminal Practice, and Criminal Costs: A Practical Guide.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Blackstone's Magistrates' Court Handbook 2013 on the Oxford University website


When Children Kill Children
Winner of the British Society of Criminology Prize 2009
Clarendon Studies in Criminology
Also available as: Hardback
Edition: 2012
Format: Paperback 2012
Author: David A. Green
ISBN: 978-0-19-965352-2
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £24.99
Publication Date: 19 January 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Tackles penal populism and the media through the lens of two specific and controversial cases in a unique treatment of this subject
Discusses the role played by political culture in explaining the different press, political, and public responses to high-profile crimes
Proposes reform strategies for improving the adversarial nature of English political culture, in contrast to the more descriptive approaches of other texts dealing with the topic
When Children Kill Children: Penal Populism and Political Culture examines the role of political culture and penal populism in the response to the emotive subject of child-on-child homicide.
 
The book explores the reasons underlying the vastly differing responses of the English and Norwegian criminal justice systems to the cases of James Bulger and Silje Redergard respectively. Whereas James Bulger's killers were subject to extreme press and public hostility, held in secure detention for nine months and tried in an adverserial court; Redergard's killers were shielded from public antagonism and carefully reintegrated into the local community. This book argues that English adverserial political culture creates far more incentives to politicize high-profile crimes than Norwegian consensus political culture. Drawing on a wealth of empirical research, the author suggests that the tendency for politicians to justify punitive responses to crime by invoking harsh political attitudes is based upon a flawed understanding of public opinion.
 
In a compelling study, this book proposes a more deliberative response to crime that accommodates the informed public in news ways - ways that might help build social capital and remove incentives for cynical penal populism.

Contents

1: When children kill children
2: Culture, politics in the media in Norway and England
3: Crime and punishment in Norway and England
4: The constraints and effects of political culture
5: The constraints of discourse
6: Media constraints and the formation of political opinions
7: Contextualizing tragedy
8: English penal policy climates and political culture
9: Political culture, legitimacy, and penal populism
10: Public opinion versus public judgment
11: Effecting penal climate change

Reviews

"Many people talk of the need for comparative method in criminology, few have attempted it and even fewer contribute so imaginatively to the forefront of scholarship as does David Green in this study." - Jock Young, Graduate Center, City University of New York. Author of The Criminological Imagination
"David Green uses comparative analysis of two high-profile child-on-child homicides to explore the complex interconnections between media processes, public opinion and political culture. It would be impressive enough to achieve Green's analytical sophistication in just one of these areas. The extraordinary achievement of When Children Kill Children is to demonstrate theoretical and empirical sophistication, resulting in compelling and cogent analysis, across all three. A remarkable feat of critical scholarship. A genuinely enlightening book." - Chris Greer, City University London
"A master class in comparative criminology, this study proves there is an alternative to demonization in response to child-on-child homicide." - David Downes, London School of Economics

"Many people talk of the need for comparative method in criminology, few have attempted it and even fewer contribute so imaginatively to the forefront of scholarship as does David Green in this study." - Jock Young, Graduate Center, City University of New York. Author of The Criminological Imagination
"David Green uses comparative analysis of two high-profile child-on-child homicides to explore the complex interconnections between media processes, public opinion and political culture. It would be impressive enough to achieve Green's analytical sophistication in just one of these areas. The extraordinary achievement of When Children Kill Children is to demonstrate theoretical and empirical sophistication, resulting in compelling and cogent analysis, across all three. A remarkable feat of critical scholarship. A genuinely enlightening book." - Chris Greer, City University London
"A master class in comparative criminology, this study proves there is an alternative to demonization in response to child-on-child homicide." - David Downes, London School of Economics


Blackstone's Police Q&A: Four Volume Pack 2013
Blackstone's Police Manuals
Edition: Eleventh Edition
Format: Four x Paperbacks
Authors: John Watson and Huw Smart
ISBN: 978-0-19-965865-7
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £59.99
Publication Date: 9th August 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Sit your OSPRE exams with confidence - more than 1000 multiple-choice questions over four volumes, presented in the same format as in the exam
Expert revision tools, providing detailed and comprehensive answers and checklists to identify areas of weakness
Fully updated for the 2013 syllabus and cross-referenced to the official Blackstone's Police Manuals 2013
New for this year - questions covering the latest legislation, including the Police Detention and Bail Act 2011, the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Criminal Procedure Rules 2011, and the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
Blackstone's Police Q&As 2013 are essential revision tools for all police officers sitting the OSPRE Part 1 promotion examinations. Written in partnership with the best-selling Blackstone's Police Manuals, the only study guides endorsed by the National Policing Improvement Agency, the Q&As' experienced author team follow subjects in the same sequence as the Manuals, providing the most authoritative means of self-testing outside of the Promotion Examinations.
 
Blackstone's Police Q&As 2013 contains hundreds of multiple-choice questions designed to reinforce knowledge and understanding of the Manuals. Matching the format of the promotions examinations, each Question has a detailed and comprehensive Answer that highlights not only the correct response, but also the reasoning behind the incorrect responses, allowing candidates to highlight any gaps or weaknesses in their knowledge. Full cross-references to the relevant Manual paragraphs and Keynotes support more effective studying and a question checklist helps candidates track their progress.
 
The 2013 editions of this popular series contain important updates, reflecting changes to the 2013 versions of the Blackstone's Police Manuals. All titles have been updated to include new questions in line with changes to recent legislation, including the Police Detention and Bail Act 2011, the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Criminal Procedure Rules 2011, the Police and Justice Act 2006, and the Coroners and Justice Act 2009.
 
This product is not endorsed by the NPIA.

Readership: Part 1 police promotions examination candidates; police officers; police trainers.


Contents

Blackstone's Police Q&A: Crime 2013
Blackstone's Police Q&A: Evidence and Procedure 2013
Blackstone's Police Q&A: Road Policing 2013
Blackstone's Police Q&A: General Police Duties 2013

The Author
John Watson, Serving police officer and qualified police trainer, and Huw Smart, Chief Inspector, South Wales Police

Reviews from previous editions

"An excellent resource and revision aid for those studying for the Sergeants' and Inspectors' promotion examinations, and also great for officers who simply want to improve their knowledge and keep up to date with changes in legislation. - Stephen Armitage, Police Constable, North Yorkshire Police

"The best way to pass the police promotion examination is to develop knowledge and technique through answering questions" - Dr Richard Heslop, Sergeant, West Yorkshire Police


Blackstone's Police Manuals 2013: Four Volume Set
2013 Edition
Blackstone's Police Manuals
Edition: 2013
Format: Paperback
Authors: Paul Connor, David Johnston, Glenn Hutton, Gavin McKinnon, Simon Cooper, and Michael Orme
ISBN: 978-0-19-965870-1
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £69.99

Publisher's Title Information

The only official study guide for the OSPRE Part 1 Police Promotion Examinations endorsed by the National Policing Improvement Agency
If it's not in the book, it won't be in the exam - questions are only drawn from the 2013 Manuals
Contains the latest case law and legislation - don't risk losing marks studying with out-of-date materials
New for this year - coverage of the Police Detention and Bail Act 2011, the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007, the Crime and Security Act 2010, and the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
Written by experienced law specialists and professionally reviewed by the NPIA, giving you confidence in the products
Blackstone's Police Manuals, available in four volumes, are the leading police reference texts in the UK. Written in consultation with police forces across England and Wales, the Manuals are the only study guides endorsed by the National Policing Improvement Agency for OSPRE Part 1 Promotion Examinations.
 
The four volumes cover all aspects of criminal law and procedure from a police officer's perspective, in line with the new OSPRE syllabus. Straightforward and accessible, the Manuals offer a logical progression through the material and are extensively cross-referenced to provide a deeper understanding and more complete perspective of police duties. For complex or commonly misunderstood areas, there are handy Keynote boxes, which point to relevant case law or provide an example of how material is used in a practical sense, helping candidates to assimilate the information better and establish the connections between legislation and police procedure. The 2013 edition has been updated to incorporate all recent legislative developments and case law, including coverage of the Police Detention and Bail Act 2011, the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007, the Crime and Security Act 2010, the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, and the Policing and Crime Act 2009. The 2013 edition also contains revised chapters on Theft and Associated Offences and Disclosure of Evidence, as well as coverage of Police and Crime Commissioners and the Mayor's Office for Policing in London, under the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011.
 
Blackstone's Police Manuals continue to be the most accessible, relevant, and focussed revision materials for Promotion Examinations. Widely used by trainers as well as police officers going for promotion, their breadth and scope also make them an invaluable resource for anyone involved in police and criminal law.
 
Blackstone's Police Manuals are also available as an online service offering fast desktop access to the complete text of the four Manuals.

Readership

Police Constables taking the Part I Sergeant's Examination and Sergeants taking the Part I Inspector's Examination. Also of interest to police training departments, police forces and associated organisations.

Contents

Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 1: Crime 2013
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 2: Evidence and Procedure 2013
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 3: Road Policing 2013
Blackstone's Police Manual Volume 4: General Police Duties 2013

Reviews

Review(s) from previous edition
 
"If you study for Police promotion you really must have these manuals. - Rob Jerrard, The City of London Police Pensioners' Newsletter

" The Blackstone's Manuals are the only choice for anyone who is serious about passing the police promotion exam." - Dr Richard Heslop, Sergeant, West Yorkshire Police

Paul Connor, Police Training Consultant, David Johnston, Barrister and Superintendent in the Metropolitan Police Service, Glenn Hutton, Private assessment and examination consultant, Gavin McKinnon, Head of Corporate Communications at Kent Police, Simon Cooper, Senior Lecturer in Law at University of Salford, and Michael Orme, Former Road Traffic Policing Officer with Greater Manchester Police

Police Culture in a Changing World
Clarendon Studies in Criminology
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Bethan Loftus
ISBN: 978-0-19-956090-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £55
Publication Date: 3rd Dec 2009

Publisher's Title Information

Offers a major ethnographic investigation of present police culture
Extensive analysis based on fieldwork involving more than 600 hours of direct observation of operational policing and over 60 direct interviews
Explores the attempts made by the police to effect cultural change to deliver a more effective and equitable service to society
Reviews the literature on police culture since the 1960s
Outlines the new social, economic and political field of contemporary British policing
This fascinating new title offers an ethnographical investigation of contemporary police culture based on extensive field work across a range of ranks and units in the UK's police force. By drawing on over 600 hours of direct observation of operational policing in urban and rural areas and interviews with over 60 officers, the author assesses what impact three decades of social, economic and political change have had on police culture. She offers new understandings of the policing of ethnicity, gender and sexuality, and the ways in which reform initiatives are accommodated and resisted within the police. The author also explores the attempts of one force to effect cultural change both to improve the working conditions of staff and to deliver a more effective and equitable service to all groups in society.
 
Beginning with a review of the literature on police culture from 30 years ago, the author goes on to outline the new social, economic and political field of contemporary British policing. Taking this as a starting point, the remaining chapters present the main findings of the empirical research in what is a a truly comprehensive analysis of present day policing culture.

Contents

Part I - Situating Police Culture
1: Replaying the Classics
2: The New Social Field of Policing
Part II - Police Culture in Motion
3: Dominant Culture Interrupted
4: Enduring Themes, Altered Times
5: Policing Diverse Publics
6: The Continuing Significance of Class
Part III - Conclusion
7: Police Culture in Transition?
Appendix- Ethnography with the Police

Reviews

“Bethan Loftus' research makes a major contribution to the analysis of contemporary policing, and of the impact of the extensive reform initiatives of the last quarter of a century. It does this by replicating the classic studies of police culture conducted from the early 1960s to the early 1980s, which constituted the core foundations of the understanding of policing. This book would thus fill a hole in the analysis of policing that has long required plugging. It does this in an outstanding way that matches the very best of the classic studies.” - Professor Robert Reiner, Professor of Criminology, London School of Economics

Preface

Research and reflection on the police has long acknowledged the important role that the informal occupational norms, values, and assumptions associated with the rank and fi le play in shaping their everyday decisions and practices. Ethnographic accounts of what has become known as police culture have spanned several decades, and continue to be widely debated in contemporary discussions of policing and police work (Banton 1964; Skolnick 1966; Westley 1970; Cain 1973; Rubinstein 1973; Reiner 1978; Punch 1979;
Ericson 1982; Holdaway 1983; Smith and Gray 1985; Young 1991). Much of these works have identified recurring themes within police dispositions and practices over time and space. It is now cliché to refer to what Reiner (2000a: Chapter 3) describes as the 'core characteristics' of police culture. Police, it is said, have an exaggerated sense of mission towards their role and crave work that promises excitement. They celebrate masculine exploits, show willingness to use force and engage in informal working practices. Officers are also continually suspicious, lead isolated social lives, and display defensive solidarity with colleagues. Police are mainly conservative in politics and morality and their culture is marked by cynicism and pessimism. Their worldview includes a simplistic, decontextualized understanding of criminality, and they are intolerant towards people who challenge the status quo. Finally, racism has been identified as one of the most central and problematic features of police culture. These features are believed to arise as officers adapt to the demands of the police role, but two propositions have nevertheless remained central to understandings in this area. Firstly, police culture exerts considerable influence over the way officers think about and interact with different strata of the public and colleaguesoften for the worse. Secondly, the informal ideologies which comprise the police identity can also undermine endeavours to reform the police.
Notwithstanding the wealth of literature in this area, recent understandings of police culture rely almost exclusively on the aforementioned bodies of work and accordingly reflect culture of a much earlier and different social, economic and political milieu. x Preface Most of the studies were conducted over thirty years ago, while others were carried out in diverse urban settings. Our understanding of police culture is also shaped by pioneering work in the USA, while more recent contributions have examined police culture only in circumstances of social and political turmoil (Glaeser 2000; Altbeker 2005; Marks 2005). We are left, as a result, with an account of police culture which largely predates the transformations which have since taken place inside police organizations and in newly identified social fields of policing. Since the classic ethnographies there have been many developments within policing contexts, many of which could be expected to impact upon the cultural expressions of the police. There has been a notable increase in the number of minority ethnic, female, and gay and lesbian police officers. An allied development is the changing face of police personnel under what is referred to as the workforce modernization agenda (HMIC 2004). Processes of civilianization carry considerable implications for cultural, ethnic, and gender diversification and may serve to dilute the traditional white, heterosexual, male composition of police organizations (Loveday 2007). Similarly, the archetypal young working class, high school educated workforce may become altered by the growing recruitment of more mature and better educated officers (Punch 2007). Reconfigurations in the external policing environment have also transformed the character of the differing 'publics' the police come into contact with. Post- war immigration and the recent expansion of the European Union has granted free movement to workers from former commonwealth countries and new member states into the United Kingdom. The upshot is that British society is more ethnically, linguistically, religiously, and culturally diverse. Added to this, political sensitivity around policing has changed remarkably since the early police ethnographies. A pivotal development is the emergence of respect for diversity and recognition of cultural and gendered identities in policing discourse and practice. Not least in the aftermath of the Macpherson Report (1999), police organizations are under pressure to understand themselves as sites of diversity and as providers of a fair and equitable policing service. Yet this repositioning has also been encouraged by a broader shift in the political climate of society where minority groups are seeking recognition for their social differences (Parekh 2000; see also Fraser 1997;
Taylor 1992). Recent years have also witnessed an unprecedented Preface xi rethinking of what public policing should comprise. Community policing has become adopted across nearly all police forces throughout the Western world, and requires officers to become better embedded in the communities they are charged with serving (Fielding 1995; Brogden and Nijhar 2005). The recasting of the public within policing discourse has likewise been accompanied by a shift in public sentiment towards the police. As Loader and Mulcahy (2003) observe, police organizations now deal with a less compliant and more demanding public.
It is also noteworthy that officers work in a markedly different environment where greater adherence to legal rules is required. This has been supplemented with enhanced demands and mechanisms for their accountability. Added to this, new public management, or NPM, has also had a significant impact on policing and refers to a variety of practices derived from the private sector and applied to the public sector, including performance management techniques and the creation of customers (McLaughlin et al 2001). At the same time, officers inhabit a moment where political discourse about 'law and order' has become intensely salient and increasingly punitive (Downes and Morgan 2002; Loader 2006;
Reiner 2007). Alongside these changes in the political sphere, late modern societies are also characterized by widespread economic division (Dahrendorf 1985; Taylor 1999; Young 1999). Growing numbers of people are excluded from secure employment and experience burgeoning hardship and insecurity. We could add that the desire to integrate the new residuum into society has also waned. As Reiner (2000a) notes, the changes that have occurred in the political economy of Western capitalism have profound implications for a larger and increasingly alienated 'police property'.
The classic police culture paradigm which has been much invoked to describe and explain a range of police perspectives and behaviour appears today somewhat exhausted. New lines of research and reflection are needed to track how, exactly, these events are shaping the cultural manifestations of the police. It is, in other words, crucial to revisit the idea of police culture in this changed, and changing, world. What aspects of the occupational culture are enduring, and what have become discontinued? What do police officers think about greater social diversity in the external and internal policing environment? How do they experience the new policing realities? Have the reorganizations in policing posed any significant threat to established police xii Preface dispositions and practices? Answering these questions is vital if we are to develop sociological understanding of what policing culture in Britain currently looks like.
My purpose in this book is to document and make sense of how the occupational value systems and practices of officers have been shaped by two transitions in policing: firstly, the national context of social, economic and political change and, secondly, the local context of changes made to reform the culture of what I shall call Northshire Police Force. In recent years, senior offi cers have embarked on a top- down reform programme aimed primarily at improving the working conditions of personnel inside the organization and the delivery of an effective and equitable service to the various publics they are charged to serve. The case of Northshire Police provides an invaluable context for examining the relevance of previous studies of police culture for the altered landscape. The empirical research underpinning the ensuing chapters derives from extensive fieldwork with front line officers and, in this sense, remains true to the tradition of the classic ethnographies. It draws upon of over 600 hours of direct observation of operational policing across two contrasting terrains, and thereby takes up Reiner's (2000b) recent appeal for police research to return to its ethnographic past in order to expose the low visibility practices of routine policing. In this book I foreground various features of police culture which have hitherto gone unnoticed, including an examination of how increasing diversification within and beyond policing organizations are shaping traditional relations, the impact of prevailing management practices on the way officers think about and perform their job, and the forms police culture takes under conditions of late modernity. By observing, documenting, and making sense of the values, beliefs, and outlooks police officers bring to bear on their work; Police Culture in a Changing World endeavours to produce a revised and fully contemporary account of police culture and accordingly extend our understanding of the inner- world of policing.
The book begins in Chapter 1 with a theoretical discussion of the concept of police culture. It addresses received understandings of the term, and explores the main properties of this phenomenon as identified by a long line of police scholars. I then examine recent thinking which challenges the conceptualization and existence of a monolithic police culture. In presenting the principal themes derived from research and reflection on Preface xiii police culture, this chapter provides a platform on which to pose the following question: does this orthodox account of police culture still hold relevance today?
Chapter 2 traces the wider 'fi eld' of contemporary British policing. In addition to outlining developments in the legal context, I am concerned primarily to locate the emergence of respect for diversity and political recognition of cultural and gendered identities in policing discourse, and the widespread economic exclusion of late modern societies. I argue that the new societal configuration raises seminal questions for police culture and the policing of social groups. Before presenting the findings from the empirical investigation, I bring into focus the research context and explain the methodology I employed in revisiting the occupational value systems and practices of the police.
Chapter 3 tracks the way in which Northshire Police has developed policies aimed at managing the current demands of greater diversity. Drawing on comments made by offi cers from different social backgrounds, I explore how the extension of recognition for hitherto marginalized groups has shaped the interior culture. In defence of threats to their increasingly beleaguered identity I show that white, heterosexual, male officers have emerged as prime propagators of resentful discourse that operates to devalue the revised accent on diversity and preserve the traditional culture. Chapter 4 leaves aside seminal questions of ethnicity, gender, and sexuality and tests the contemporary relevance of other classic themes of police culture for the altered context of policing. The narrative captures interesting sources of variation between the cultures of those working within the two policing areas, but finds that officers mainly shared a related set of assumptions, beliefs, and practices which transcended the contrasting terrains. In exploring the endurance of these proverbial characteristics, I point to broader questions about the very essence of the police role.
Chapter 5 examines how the new policing realities have shaped relations between the police and those groups emphasized in 'policing diversity' policy agendas. I show that responses to the policing context are contradictory and uneven. In the wake of the diversity emphasis, aspects of the culture are being revised and unlearned. However, other features remain remarkably unchallenged by the reorganizations that have occurred in policing.
Chapter 6 questions the current dominance of diversity within policing agendas by demonstrating that issues of class remain xiv Preface crucial in understanding policing discourses and practices. Taking class contempt as a relatively unexamined feature of police culture, I argue that sections of the white 'underclass' operate as uncontentiously legitimate terrain for the unchallenged exercise of police discretion and authority. This was also the group that occupied an overridingly prominent position in the police mind as socially defi ling.
The book concludes in Chapters 7 and 8 with an identification of the main findings and implications of the research. My argument locates a tension between the changes that have clearly occurred in the policing landscape and the persistence of police cultural characteristics as observed by earlier scholars. In contradistinction with current scholarship I question the extent to which police culture has changed in light of developments in policing. Police culture endures, I argue, because the basic pressures associated with the police role have not been removed and because social transformations have exacerbated, rather than reduced, the basic definitions of inequality. These wider dilemmas underline the contradictions of achieving any meaningful reconfiguration of police culture.


What is Criminology?
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Also available as: Hardback
Author: Edited by Mary Bosworth and Carolyn Hoyle
ISBN: 978-0-19-965992-0
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £24.99
Publication Date: 31st May 2012

Publisher's Title Information

An indispensible guide for all academics and students of criminology, providing a critical assessment of the current state and future directions of the discipline
Includes specially-commissioned contributions from leading scholars including Andrew Ashworth, Alfred Blumstein, Pat Carlen, Kathy Daly, David Garland, Michael Gottfredson, Ian Loader, Beth Rochie, William Schabas, and Lucia Zedner, with a preface by John Braithwaite
Criminology is a booming discipline, yet one which can appear divided and fractious. In this rich and diverse collection of essays, some of the world's leading criminologists respond to a series of questions designed to investigate the state, impact, and future challenges of the discipline: What is criminology for? What is the impact of criminology? How should criminology be done? What are the key issues and debates in criminology today? What challenges does the discipline of criminology face? How has criminology as a discipline changed over the last few decades?
 
The resulting essays identify a series of intellectual, methodological, and ideological borders. Borders, in criminology as elsewhere, are policed, yet they are also frequently transgressed; criminologists can and do move across them to plunder, admire, or learn from other regions. While some boundaries may be more difficult or dangerous to cross than others it is rare to find an entirely secluded locale or community.
 
In traversing ideological, political, geographical, and disciplinary borders, criminologists bring training, tools, and concepts, as well as key texts to share with foreigners. From such exchanges, over time, borders may break down, shift, or spring up, enriching those who take the journey and those who are visited. It is, in other words, in criminology's capacity for and commitment to reflexivity, on which the strength of the field depends.

Preface: John Braithwaite
Mary Bosworth and Carolyn Hoyle: Introduction
PART I Criminology and its Constituencies
1. Conceptual allegiances: whose side are you on?
1: Ian Loader and Richard Sparks: Criminology's Public Roles: A Drama in Six Acts
2: Michael R. Gottfredson: Some Advantages of a Crime-Free Criminology
3: Eugene McLaughlin: Critical Criminology: The Renewal of Theory Politics and Practice
4: Jeff Ferrell: Disciplinarity and Drift
5: David Brown: The Global Financial Crisis: Neo-Liberalism, Social Democracy and Criminology
6: Pat Carlen: Against Evangelism in Academic Criminology: For Criminology as a Scientific Art
2. Methodological allegiances: how should criminology be done?
7: Kathleen Daly: Shake it up Baby: Practicing Rock 'n' Roll Criminology
8: Clifford Shearing and Monique Marks: Criminology's Disney World: The Ethnographer's Ride of South African Criminal Justice
9: Nicole Rafter: Origins of Criminology
10: Linda G. Mills: He was a Woman: Pitfalls and Possibilities of Popular Audiences
11: Marcus Felson: Sort Crimes, Not Criminals
12: Paternoster and Shawn Bushway: Studying Desistance from Crime: Where Quantitative Meets Qualitative Methods
13: Mike Hough: Criminology and the Role of Experimental Research
3. Political allegiances: what is criminology for?
14: Beth E. Richie: Criminology and Social Justice: Expanding the Intellectual Commitment
15: Thomas Mathiesen and Ole Kristian Hjemdal: A New Look at Victim and Offender - An Abolitionist Approach
16: Natalie J. Sokoloff and Amanda Burgess-Proctor: Remembering Criminology's 'Forgotten Theme': Seeking Justice in U.S. Crime Policy Using an Intersectional Approach
17: Chris Cunneen: Postcolonial Perspectives for Criminology
PART II Criminology and its Borders

Reviews to Date

"Over 36 chapters Bosworth and Hoyle's collection provides unsurpassed insight into the rocky, but nonetheless exciting, terrain to be negotiated in being a criminologist. It is essential reading for those already negotiating (and perhaps lost on) that terrain, and must surely become both a comprehensive and challenging resource for the orientation of newcomers." - Alistair Henry, Edinburgh Law Review
The Authors

Edited by Mary Bosworth, Reader in Criminology, University of Oxford, Fellow of St Cross College, and Professor of Criminology, Monash University, Australia, and Carolyn Hoyle, Professor of Criminology, University of Oxford and Fellow of Green Templeton College
Mary Bosworth is Reader in Criminology at the University of Oxford and Fellow of St Cross College. She joined the Oxford Centre for Criminology in 2006. She is also concurrently Professor of Criminology at Monash University, Australia. Her major research interests are in punishment, incarceration, and immigration detention with a particular focus on how matters of race, gender and citizenship shape the experience and nature of confinement.
Carolyn Hoyle is Professor of Criminology at the University of Oxford and Fellow of Green Templeton College. She has been at the Oxford Centre for Criminology since 1991. She has published empirical and theoretical research on a number of criminological topics including policing, domestic violence, restorative justice, and the death penalty.

Contributors:
 
Katja Franko Aas, University of Oslo
Andrew Ashworth, University of Oxford
Charles Barber, Yale University School of Medicine and Director of The Connection Institute
Alfred Blumstein, Carnegie Mellon University
Benjamin Bowling, School of Law, Kings College, London
John Braithwaite, Australian National University
David Brown, University of New South Wales, emeritus
Shawn Bushway, University at Albany, SUNY
Amanda Burgess-Proctor, Oakland University
Pat Carlen, University of Keele, emeritus
Janet Chan, University of New South Wales
Chris Cunneen, University of New South Wales
Kathleen Daly, Griffith University
Aaron Doyle, Carleton University
Marcus Felson, Rutgers University
Jeff Ferrell, Texas Christian University and University of Kent
David Garland, New York University
Michael R. Gottfredson, University of California, Irvine
Kevin D. Haggerty, University of Alberta
Kelly Hannah-Moffat, University of Toronto
Ole Kristian Hjemdal, Oslo University College
Tim Hope, Keele University
Mike Hough, School of Law at King's College London
Alison Liebling, University of Cambridge
Ian Loader, University of Oxford
Monique Marks, University of KwaZulu-Natal
Shadd Maruna, Queen's University, Belfast
Thomas Mathiesen, University of Oslo, emeritus
Eugene McLaughlin, City University, London
Linda G. Mills, New York University
David Nelken, University of Macerata
Tim Newburn, London School of Economics
Ian O'Donnell, University College Dublin
Stephan Parmentier, University of Leuven
Raymond Paternoster, University of Maryland
Nicole Rafter, Northeastern University
Beth E. Richie, University of Illinois
William A. Schabas, National University of Ireland, Galway
Clifford Shearing, University of Cape Town
Lawrence W. Sherman, University of Cambridge
Natalie J. Sokoloff, John Jay College, City University of New York.
Richard Sparks, University of Edinburgh
Lucia Zedner, University of Oxford


Effective Investigation of Child Homicide and Suspicious Deaths
Blackstone's Practical Policing
All royalties from the sale of this book will go to the national police charity, Child Victims of Crime www.cvoc.org.uk
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: David Marshall
ISBN: 9780199639175
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £39.99
Publication Date: 9th Feb 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Foreword by Lord Laming of Tewin: 'This is a book specially designed to promote good practice and better outcomes for children and families. It is as readable as it is instructive.'
Offers the first practical guide to managing the police investigation of child death
Sets out the protocols and procedures relating to sudden and unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI), suspicious cases, and homicide
Outlines the relevant procedures of inquests and the criminal and family courts
Summarises specific offences relating to child deaths, such as infanticide and familial homicide
Includes striking but sensitive personal accounts from the families of victims
Written by an experienced detective with over 30 years' experience, in consultation with paediatric pathologists, CPS lawyers and major crime investigators
Crimes against children are some of the most serious and demanding investigations that a police force can be involved with. It is an extremely specialised crime area, with its own legislation, case law, guidance and crucial multi-agency working. This book offers a practical operational guide to managing the investigation of child death, and sets out the protocols and procedures relating to these deaths, from sudden and unexpected deaths in infancy (SUDI) to suspicious cases and homicide.
 
Following the death of Baby Peter and the subsequent report by Lord Laming in 2009, Effective Investigation of Child Homicide and Suspicious Deaths outlines the revised statutory guidance on inter-agency working. By bringing together the key legislation, guidance, policies and procedures, along with operational options and background information, the author creates an indispensable resource for those tasked with this challenging but essential work. Drawing on his own extensive experiences, he outlines the relevant procedures of inquests and the criminal and family courts, and summarises the specific offences relating to child deaths such as infanticide, familial homicide, procuring an abortion, and child destruction. The role of expert medical evidence is explained, as are the procedures relating to forensic post-mortems and forensic samples and tests, with contributions from key medical professionals framing the complex and technical within a more practical setting. A reminder of the nuances of child death investigations is present in the striking but sensitive inclusion of personal accounts from the families of victims.
 
Effective Investigation of Child Homicide and Suspicious Deaths forms part of the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series. The series consists of practical guides containing clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation, police procedure and practice, accompanied by case studies, illustrative diagrams and useful checklists.

Contents

1: History and Background to Child Death Investigation
2: The Investigative Focus and Mind-set in Childhood Death
3: Guidance and Legislation
4: Non-suspicious Child Deaths
5: Suspicious Child Deaths and Related Child Death Offences
6: Homicide
7: Case Management and Reviews

Reviews to Date

"It is difficult to think of a better guide to this complex area of practice than David Marshall." - The Journal of Homicide and Major Incident Investigation, Volume 8, Issue 1

"David Marshall has made a valuable contribution to our knowledge and practice in this area. This book will help SIOs to become better prepared to carry out these important and difficult enquiries and it should find a place on every investigators book shelf." - The Journal of Homicide and Major Incident Investigation, Volume 8, Issue 1
David Marshall QPM MSc recently retired from the Metropolitan Police with over 30 year's service, including postings on the International and Organised Crime Branch and Paedophile Unit at New Scotland Yard. For the last nine years as DCI he was head of the Specialist Crime Directorates Child Abuse Investigation Command's major investigation team responsible for the investigation of complex abuse, child homicides and suspicious deaths in London. In this position he had experience of over fifty child homicides and suspicious deaths. He regularly lectures on the NPIA Investigating Sudden Childhood Death Programme, is a faculty member on the University of Warwick Advanced Course in the Management of Unexpected Childhood Death and was a UK representative on the Interpol Specialist Group on Crimes against Children. He has contributed to national police guidance, written a number of published articles and presented on numerous conferences and courses in the UK and abroad.
Contributors:
 
Russell J Wate QPM, a Director of RJW Associates Ltd and former Head of Investigations Directorate for the Cambridgeshire Constabulary, UK
 
Professor Tony Risdon, Consultant Histopathologist, Department of Paediatric Laboratory Medicine, Great Ormond Street Hospital, UK
 
Dr Martin Weber, Consultant in Paediatric Pathology, Department of Histopathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, UK
 
Dr Lizzy Dierckx, Consultant Community Paediatrician and Lead for the Rapid Response Team investigating Sudden Unexpected Child Death, Greater Manchester, UK
 
Nadine Tilbury, Former Senior Crown Prosecutor and Senior Policy Advisor for the CPS and CPS Policy lead on Safeguarding Children
 
Tony Osborne, NPIA's National Advisor for Suspicious Missing Person Cases
Chloe Hawkins, Adviser for the National Injuries Database
 
Professor Neil Sebire, Professor of Paediatric Pathology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London

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Covert Investigation
Blackstone's Practical Policing
Edition: 3rd
Format: Paperback
Authors: Clive Harfield and Karen Harfield
ISBN: 978-0-19-964698-2
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £39.99
Publication Date: 14 June 2012
 

Publisher's Title Information

Provides a practical and accessible guide to covert policing law
Designed to improve the quality of RIPA applications and help investigators apply the law and procedure correctly
Considers different aspects of covert investigation in turn, discussing statutory provision and introducing case law alongside investigation management issues
Offers an introduction to covert investigation, making statutory powers less puzzling for investigators to understand and use
Includes discussion of often overlooked areas, such as risk assessment and covert investigation management
Contains all the relevant legislation, codes of practice and case-law relating to covert investigation methods

New to this edition

Updated to include significant amendments to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 brought about by the Police and Crime Act 2009
Revised appendices covering the complete RIPA Codes of Practice
The third edition of Covert Investigation continues to provide a practical, straightforward guide for anyone working in the area of covert investigation.
This edition is updated to include significant amendments to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 brought about by the Police and Crime Act 2009, as well as revisions to the Codes of Practice. Also included are discussions reflecting the considerations of Parliamentary and Home Office reviews of surveillance practice and law: reviews undertaken in response to practitioner concerns about the RIPA authority regime and wider public concerns about an emerging surveillance society. The book contains all the relevant legislation, codes of practice and case-law relating to covert investigation methods and examines the issues that investigators need to consider when deploying such investigative tools, concentrating on the full implications of RIPA with regards to daily, routine policing activity.
 
The authors consider each different aspect of covert investigation in turn, discussing statutory provision and introducing case law alongside investigation management issues. It successfully demystifies an area of investigation and enforcement that has hitherto been poorly understood. It is intended to assist those planning and supervising investigations and those with a statutory obligation to sanction applications for authorised covert investigation or withhold such authority. It will help officers improve the quality of RIPA applications and ensure that applications for cover investigation are made only in appropriate circumstances. In particular, the third edition looks at incontrovertible evidence, the strict statutory and procedural frameworks governing collection of such evidence, and how to minimize the risk of unwitting abuse of these powers and procedures which can lead to technical acquittals and procedural challenges at court.
 
The book forms part of the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series. The series, aimed at junior to middle ranking officers, consists of practical guides containing clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation and practice, accompanied by case studies, illustrative diagrams and useful checklists.

Contents

1: Covert investigation in context
2: Directed surveillance
3: Intrusive surveillance
4: Interference with property or wireless telegraphy and entry onto land
5: Covert investigation and computers
6: Examining mobile phones
7: Communications data
8: Interception of communications
9: Covert human intelligence sources
10: Covert investigation abroad
11: Risk management
Appendices
A: Covert Surveillance and Property Interference: Revised Code of Practice
B: Investigation of Protected Electronic Information Code of Practice
C: Acquisition and Disclosure of Communications Data Code of Practice
D: Interception of Communications Code of Practice
E: Covert Human Intelligence Sources Code of Practice

The Authors

Clive Harfield is Associate Professor of Law at the University of Wollongong, NSW. He previously served with the National Crime Squad and as a Detective Inspector and BCU Intelligence and Covert Operations Manager for Warwickshire Police.
Karen Harfield is the Executive Director of Performance and Stakeholder Relations at the Australian Crime Commission (ACC). She joined the ACC in 2008. Ms Harfield began her policing career in 1992 and progressed through a range of roles to Chief Superintendent with Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary. Other roles have included Detective Chief Inspector with the National Crime Squad, Director of Intelligence with Warwickshire Police and Senior Investigating Officer for homicide and specialist covert investigations. In 2000, she was selected to attend the US Government International Visitors Program. For more than 60 years, the International Visitors Program has brought foreign leaders and specialists to the United States for firsthand exposure to their professional counterparts and US society. The emphasis of the program is to increase mutual understanding through communication at the personal and professional levels.

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Breaking Rules: The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People's Urban Crime
Clarendon Studies in Criminology
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardback
Authors: Per-Olof H. Wikström, Dietrich Oberwittler, Kyle Treiber, and Beth Hardie
ISBN: 978-0-19-959284-5
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £60
Publication Date: 24th may 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Presents the findings of a major longitudinal study (PADS+), involving a cohort of 700 young people from the age of 12
Introduces Situational Action Theory, an innovative theory and methodology in the study of the role of the social environment in crime causation
Reviews the literature on urban crime, highlighting key theoretical and methodological problems, and demonstrates how Situational Action Theory can overcome these difficulties
Why do certain people commit acts of crime? Why does crime happen in certain places? Presenting an ambitious new study designed to test a pioneering new theory of the causes of crime, Breaking Rules: The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People's Urban Crime demonstrates that these questions can only go so far in explaining why crime happens - and, therefore, in preventing it.
 
Based on the work of the Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+), Breaking Rules presents an analysis of the urban structure of Peterborough and its relation to young people's social life. Contemporary sciences state that behaviour is the outcome of an interaction between people and the environments to which they are exposed, and it is precisely that interaction and its relation to young people's crime involvement that PADS+ explores. Driven by a ground-breaking theory of crime, Situational Action Theory, which aims to explain why people break rules, it implements innovative methods of measuring social environments and people's exposure to them, involving a cohort of 700 young people growing up in the UK city of Peterborough. It focuses on the important adolescent time window, ages 12 to 17, during which young people's crime involvement is at its peak, using unique space-time budget data to explore young people's time use, movement patterns, and the spatio-temporal characteristics of their crime involvement.
 
Presenting the first study of this kind, both in breadth and detail, with significant implications for policy and prevention, Breaking Rules should not only be of great interest to academic readers, but also to policy-makers and practitioners, interested in issues of urban environments, crime within urban environments, and the role of social environments in crime causation.

Contents

PART 1 - Analysing crime as situational action: Theory, methods, key constructs, and basic findings
1: Situational Action Theory (SAT)
2: The Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+)
3: Young people's crime, crime propensity, and criminogenic exposure: Key constructs and basic findings
PART 2 - The social dynamics of young people's urban crime
4: Peterborough, its urban structure, and crime
5: Young offenders and their crimes in the urban environment
6: Young people, their activities, and criminogenic exposure
PART 3 - The situational dynamics of young people's crime
7: The crime convergence: Kinds of people in kinds of settings
8: Choosing crime as an alternative: Crime propensity, the perception-choice process, and crime
PART 4 - It's all about interactions
9: Key findings and implications
Appendices
Technical appendix
Space-time budget coding appendix

Reviews

"Among the most significant works in criminology in decades" - Professor Michael Gottfredson, University of California, As quoted in The Independent

"A breakthrough that deserves a wide readership" - Professor Robert Sampson, Harvard University, as quoted in the Independent

"Breaking Rules is among the most significant works in criminology in decades. It sets the standard for sophisticated and innovative measurement, for careful and well - executed research design, and for clarity and precision of presentation. It both presents and explicates an innovative theory of crime, one that is broad in scope and appropriately ambitious. The data and their analyses are of vital importance to cumulative knowledge in criminology. With this book, Situational Action Theory takes its place as among the most important perspectives in modern criminology and the study provides data of unprecedented scope and quality.Breaking Rules represents the best tradition of the science of criminology and as such it commands the attention of the field." - Professor Michael R. Gottfredson, University of California

"Breaking Rules is a truly impressive book that combines all of the features of first-rate scholarship in the social sciences. The theorizing, in the form of Situational Action Theory (SAT), is creative. The methodological procedures are carefully crafted and skillfully executed to serve the theoretical objectives of the research. Moreover, the extensive and rich analyses of the data from the Peterborough Adolescent and Young Adult Development Study (PADS+) yield compelling insights about who commits crimes, when, where, and - most importantly - why." - Professor Steven F. Messner, University at Albany

"Criminology has produced a staggering amount of data and findings. Correlates of crime are everywhere but theoretical interpretation of their meaning is fraught with disagreement, Wikström and colleagues cut through the fog with a compelling new theory and multi-faceted longitudinal study of adolescents that lays bare the fundamental importance of situational dynamics and their interaction with both person-level characteristics and the larger social environment of the city. The theoretical emphasis on situation and individual action in context is original and the empirical analysis is carefully constructed to assess major hypotheses. Breaking Rules is a breakthrough that deserves a wide readership." - Professor Robert J. Sampson, Harvard University

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Tough Choices
Risk, Security and the Criminalization of Drug Policy
Clarendon Studies in Criminology
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardback
Author: Toby Seddon, Lisa Williams, and Robert Ralphs
ISBN: 978-0-19-969723-6
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £60.00
 
Publication Date: 17th May 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Examines the transformation of recent drug policy, the growing emphasis on links with crime and the integration of drug treatment within the criminal justice system
Explores how the strategic vision of the drug-crime 'problem' has shaped the ways in which drug-using offenders are identified, targeted and managed
Presents analysis of policy documents and nearly 200 interviews conducted with key players in the policy development and implementation process, from senior civil servants to drug users
Based on a 30-month ESRC-funded research project, 'Governing drug-related crime in the risk society'
In recent years, British drug policy has undergone a transformation: tackling 'drug-driven' crime through criminal justice interventions has arguably become the central priority and focus. The 'criminal justice turn', as the authors refer to current UK drugs policy, is based on three simple and linked assumptions: drug-driven property crime is a major driver of local area crime rates, especially in deprived neighbourhoods; the criminal justice system can be used to target these drug-motivated offenders and direct them into treatment; and treatment can lead to significant reductions in their offending.
 
Tough Choices: Risk, Security and the Criminalization of Drug Policy explores a series of questions about the 'criminal justice' turn in British drugs policy, from why it happened at all to what led policy to unfold in the way that it did, by analyzing policy documents and over 200 interviews conducted with key players in the policy development and implementation process. At the practice level, the authors explore how the strategic vision of the drug-crime 'problem' has shaped the ways in which drug-using offenders are identified, targeted and managed - in other words, why the implementation of the Drug Interventions Programme on the ground has taken the forms that it has. This is addressed through a detailed examination of practice in three local areas. Both the emergence of this new policy direction and its implementation in practice can best be understood as part of a wider transformation in governance in which risk-based thinking has become central to the ways in which we seek to address our contemporary insecurities.
 
The book is based on a 30-month ESRC-funded research project on the Drug Interventions Programme and draws on the extensive empirical data generated during the project.

Contents

1: Introduction: Drugs, Crime and Criminal Justice
2: Risk, Security and the Criminal Justice Turn
3: The Politics of Drug Policy-Making
4: Police Custody: A Risk Filtering Machine
5: Criminal Courts: A Risk Management System
6: Drugs Work / Knowledge Work
7: The Impact of the Criminal Justice Turn
8: Conclusions: Reimagining Risk and Security

The Authors

Toby Seddon is a Professor in the School of Law at the University of Manchester and a co-founder of the research group ManReg (The Manchester Centre for Regulation, Governance & Security). He has been involved in drugs research for nearly 20 years and has a particular interest in developing new regulatory perspectives on drug policy.

Lisa Williams is a Lecturer in Criminology in the School of Law at the University of Manchester. Her principal interests are in the area of recreational drug use and she is co-author of the revised edition of the landmark text Illegal Leisure Revisited (Routledge, 2011). Her monograph Changing Lives, Changing Drug Journeys (Routledge, 2012) examines drug-taking in the context of the life-course.

Robert Ralphs is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the Department of Sociology at Manchester Metropolitan University. He has diverse research interests, including drug use, youth gangs and youth crime. He is co-author of a forthcoming book based on a major ethnographic study of youth gangs (Youth Gangs in an English City, Routledge).


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From Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime
Criminal Careers, Justice Policy and Prevention
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Rolf Loeber and David P. Farrington
ISBN: 978-0-19-982818-0
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £17.99
Publication Date: 21st June 2012

Publisher's title Information

This volume focuses exclusively on the transition from juvenile to adult crime and argues for special legal provisions for offenders aged 18-24
What makes a juvenile delinquent develop into an adult criminal? What defines-cognitively, developmentally, legally-the transition from juvenile to adult and what determines whether patterns of criminal behavior persist? In most US states and Western nations, legal adulthood begins at age 18. This volume focuses on the period surrounding that abrupt transition (roughly ages 15-29) and addresses what happens to offending careers during it.

Edited by two leading authorities in the fields of psychology and criminology, Transitions from Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime examines why the period of transition is important and how it can be better understood and addressed both inside and outside of the justice system. Bringing together over thirty leading scholars from multiple disciplines in both North America and Europe, this volume asks critical questions about criminal careers and causation, and whether current legal definitions of adulthood accurately reflect actual maturation and development. The volume also addresses the current efficacy of the justice system in addressing juvenile crime and recidivism, why and how juveniles ought to be treated differently from adults, if special legal provisions should be established for young adults, and the effectiveness of crime prevention programs implemented during early childhood and adolescence.
With serious scholarly analysis and practical policy proposals, Transitions from Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime addresses what can be done to ensure that today's juvenile delinquents do not become tomorrow's adult criminals.

Contents

Foreword
Laurie O. Robinson
Acknowledgements
Contributors
1. Introduction
Rolf Loeber and David P. Farrington
2. Criminal career patterns
Alex Piquero, J. David Hawkins, and Lila Kazemian
3. Explanations for offending
Terence P. Thornberry, Peggy C. Giordano, Christopher Uggen, Mauri Matsuda, Ann S. Masten, Erik Bulten and Andrea G. Donker
4. Contextual influences
Julie Horney, Patrick Tolan and David Weisburd
5. Special categories of serious and violent offenders: Drug dealers, gang members, homicide offenders, and sex offenders
Richard Rosenfeld, Helene R. White and Finn-Aage Esbensen
6. Prediction and risk/needs assessments
Robert D. Hoge, Gina Vincent, and Laura Guy
7. Legal boundaries between the juvenile and criminal justice systems in the United States
Patrick Griffin
8. Young offenders and an effective justice system response: What happens, what should happen, and what we need to know
James C. Howell, Barry C. Feld, and Daniel P. Mears
9. Promoting change, changing lives: Effective prevention and intervention to reduce serious offending
Brandon C. Welsh, Mark W. Lipsey, Frederick P. Rivara, J. David Hawkins, Steve Aos, and Meghan E. Peel
10. European perspectives
Martin Killias, Santiago Redondo and Jerzy Sarnecki
11. Conclusions and headline recommendations
Rolf Loeber, David P. Farrington, James C. Howell and Machteld Hoeve
Index

The Authors

Edited by Rolf Loeber, Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Epidemiology, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, and David P. Farrington, Professor of Psychological Criminology, Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University
Rolf Loeber, Ph.D., is Distinguished University Professor of Psychiatry, and Professor of Psychology, and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh and Professor of Juvenile Delinquency and Social Development at the Free University, Amsterdam, Netherlands. He is Co-director of the Life History Program. David P. Farrington, O.B.E., is Professor of Psychological Criminology at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh.

Contributors:

Steve Aos, Ph.D., is the Director of the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, the non-partisan research unit of the Washington State Legislature.
 
Erik Bulten, Ph.D., psychologist, Head of Assessment, Research and Professional Development at the Pompe Foundation, Nijmegen, and senior researcher at the ACSW, Radboud University, Nijmegen.
 
Andrea Donker, Ph.D. is professor at the University of Applied Sciences, Leiden, Netherlands, and is senior researcher at the University of Applied Sciences, Utrecht.
 
Finn-Aage Esbensen, Ph.D., is the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Youth Crime and Violence and also serves as Chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.
 
David P. Farrington, Ph.D., O.B.E., is Professor of Psychological Criminology at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh.
 
Barry C. Feld, Ph.D., is Centennial Professor of Law, University of Minnesota Law School.
 
Peggy C. Giordano, Ph.D., is Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State University.
 
Patrick Griffin, J.D., is a writer, researcher, legal analyst.
 
Laura Guy, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Mental Health Services Research in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), Worcester, MA.
 
J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., is Endowed Professor of Prevention and Founding Director of the Social Development Research Group at the School of Social Work, University of Washington.
 
Machteld Hoeve, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor Forensic Child and Youth Care Sciences at the Research Institute Child Development and Education of the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
 
Robert Hoge, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor of Psychology and Distinguished Research Professor, Carleton University.
 
James C. (Buddy) Howell, Ph.D., worked at the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the U.S. Department of Justice for 21 years, mostly as Director of Research and Program Development.
 
Lila Kazemian, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the department of Sociology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice.
 
Martin Killias, Ph.D., is professor of criminology and criminal law at the University of Zurich.
 
Mark W. Lipsey, Ph.D., is Director of the Peabody Research Institute and a Research Professor at Vanderbilt University.
 
Rolf Loeber, Ph.D., is Distinguished University Professor of Psychiatry, and Professor of Psychology, and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., and Professor of Juvenile Delinquency and Social Development at the Free University, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
 
Ann Masten, Ph.D., is Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota.
 
Daniel P. Mears, Ph.D., is the Mark C. Stafford Professor of Criminology at Florida State University's College of Criminology and Criminal Justice.
 
Meghan E. Peel, M.Sc., is a doctoral candidate at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University and a Research Associate at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement.
 
Alex R. Piquero, Ph.D., is Professor in the Program in Criminology in the School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas, Adjunct Professor Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice, and Governance, Griffith University and Co-Editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology.
 
Santiago Redondo, Ph.D., is Professor of Criminology at the University of Barcelona (Spain).
 
Frederick P. Rivara, M.D., M.P.H., is the holder of the Seattle Children's Guild Endowed Chair in Pediatrics, Professor of Pediatrics and adjunct Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Washington.
 
Richard Rosenfeld, Ph.D., is Curators Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Missouri - St. Louis.
 
Jerzy Sarnecki, Ph.D., is Professor of General Criminology at Stockholm University, Sweden.
 
Terence P. Thornberry, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland and the Principal Investigator of the Rochester Youth Development Study.
 
Patrick H. Tolan Ph.D., is Director, Youth-Nex: The University of Virginia Center to Promote Effective Youth Development and Professor in the Curry School of Education and Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences.
 
Christopher Uggen, Ph.D., is Distinguished McKnight Professor and Chair of Sociology at the University of Minnesota.
 
Gina M. Vincent, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor and Director of Translational Law and Psychiatry Research in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA.
 
David L. Weisburd, Ph.D., is Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice and Director of the Institute of Criminology at the Hebrew University Law School, and Distinguished Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society, and Director of the Center for Evidence Based Crime Policy at George Mason University.
 
Brandon C. Welsh, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University and a Senior Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement.
 
Helene R. White, Ph.D., is a Professor at the Center of Alcohol Studies and Sociology Department at Rutgers - the State University of New Jersey.

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Blackstone's Employment Law Practice 2012
Edition: 2012 7th Edition
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Gavin Mansfield, John Bowers QC, Damian Brown, Simon Forshaw, Anthony Korn, Julia Palca, and David Reade QC
ISBN: 978-0-19-969284-2
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £75
Publication Date: 15th March 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Unparalleled coverage and practical explanation of employment law and procedure in the employment tribunal and civil courts
Expert author team handpicked to provide concise, practical coverage
Designed for quick and easy access - clear page design, quick reference guides, and procedural checklists guide you swiftly through this area of law

New to this edition

Contains a new chapter on insolvency and an expanded and revised discussion of the tax treatment of tribunal awards
Updated coverage of relevant case law and legislation across all areas of employment law, from initial applications to remedies.
Drawing together comprehensive coverage of practice and procedure in the employment tribunal, Employment Appeal Tribunal, and Central Arbitration Committee, Blackstone's Employment Law Practice 2012 is an essential purchase for any serious employment practitioner. Ideal for preparing for and during a case in tribunal or court, it includes trusted advice on specialist topics, such as the application of TUPE and the calculation of costs.
 
This new edition draws together comprehensive coverage of practice and procedure in the courts and tribunals, making it an essential purchase for every employment practitioner. An eminent team of authors bring together consummate experience of every aspect of employment law and practice to offer up-to-date advice and commentary on the latest developments in substantive law and procedure, including the continuing changes brought about by the Equality Act 2010.
 
Blackstone's Employment Law Practice 2012 offers:
 
Unparalleled coverage and practical explanation of employment law and procedure in the employment tribunal and civil courts
A new chapter on insolvency and an expanded discussion of the tax treatment of awards
Updated coverage of relevant case law and legislation across all areas of employment law
A range of flowcharts and procedural checklists to provide immediate clarification of complex procedural issues
Clear page design to ensure easy navigation and quick access to essential information
Appendices offering quick and easy access to current and historical financial data

Contents

Part A: Tribunal Procedure
1: Jurisdiction and Constitution
2: Claim Form
3: Time Limits
4: The Response
5: Conciliation and Settlement
6: Case Management
7: Interim Applications: Pre-hearing Review and Other Preliminary Issues
8: Contractual Claims
9: The Hearing
10: Bias and Improper Conduct of Hearing
11: Judgments, Decisions, and Orders
12: Costs
13: Review
14: Enforcement of Tribunal Awards
15: Special Jurisdictions
16: Human Rights Claims
17: Group Litigation
18: Employment Appeal Tribunal
19: Tribunal Procedure and Appeals in Scotland
Part B: Procedure in Other Jurisdictions
20: Employment Litigation in the Civil Courts
21: Court of Appeal
22: European Union Law and References to the European Court of Justice
23: Collective Labour Law Institutions - The Central Arbitration Committee and Certification Officer
Part C: Remedies
24: Remedies for Unfair Dismissal
25: Remedies in Discrimination Cases
26: Recoupment of Benefits
27: Interest on Employment Tribunal Awards
28: Tax and Termination Payments and Employment Tribunal Awards
29: Insolvency and Employment Law
Part D: The Substantive Law
30: Dismissal
31: Redundancy
32: Discrimination
33: Equal Pay
34: Unlawful Deductions from Wages
35: Transfer of Undertakings
Appendices
Appendix 1 - Selected Legislation: Statutes
Appendix 2 - Selected Legislation: Statutory Instruments
Appendix 3 - Selected Legislation: Rules
Appendix 4 - Selected Legislation: European Community Materials
Appendix 5 - Practice Directions
Appendix 6 - Codes of Practice
Appendix 7 - Financial Information
Appendix 8 - Forms and Precedents
Appendix 9 - Tables

Reviews

Review(s) from previous edition
 
"Blackstone's Employment Law Practice provides an excellent guide to the increasingly complex world of practice and procedure in employment law, both in tribunals and the civil courts. The appendices are particularly useful. No employment lawyer should be without it. - Barry J. Clarke, Partner, Russell Jones & Walker, Cardiff and national chairman of the Employment Lawyers' Association
"Containing statutes and key materials along with a concise commentary on procedure and substantive law, this invaluable book has everything you need to advise clients and appear before tribunals with confidence. Why use multiple books when this one is the only one you need? " - Jody Atkinson, Barrister, St Johns' Chambers
"Practitioners have been waiting for a one-volume compendium like this for years. It is often the only book you need to take to the tribunal...Every authoritative statement you need at your fingertips. " - Jeremy Nixon, Bird & Bird, the New Law Journal
"This is a new and innovative volume that deserves a place in the employment law library. " - Philip Wood, Dawsons, the ELA Briefing
"It is extremely valuable to have all the key areas of procedure and practice summarised into a single volume. I found the sections on tribunal practice to be the most valuable, set out in a clearly accessible manner with helpful explanations of difficult points. The legislation is well selected, and the summaries of the substantive law proved to be useful reminders of the key issues. And all this for a price far more reasonable than one might imagine for a work of this quality. " - Geoffrey Mead, Partner, Collyer Bristow
"This book is very useful for union lawyers, officers and representatives dealing with employment law casework, as it combines substantive law with clear explanations of procedural rules in one volume. " - Lucy Anderson, NUT
"The volume is a very useful, reliable and portable work of reference both for busy practitioners and those who may not appear in employment tribunals regularly. " - Janet Gaymer CBE QC, Commissioner for Public Appointments

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of Blackstone's Employment Law & Practice 2012 on the Oxford University website


The [Oxford] Handbook of Crime Prevention
Edition: 1st
Format:
Authors: Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington
ISBN: 978-0-19-539882-3
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £95
Publication Date: 19th April 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The first stand-alone, comprehensive account of the subject, drawing from a range of important literatures
How can a society prevent-not deter, not punish-but prevent crime? Criminal justice prevention, commonly called crime control, aims to prevent crime after an initial offence has been commited through anything from an arrest to a death penalty sentence. These traditional means have been frequently examined and their efficacy just as frequently questioned. Promising new forms of crime prevention have emerged and expanded as important components of an overall strategy to reduce crime.
 
Crime prevention today has developed along three lines: interventions to improve the life chances of children and prevent them from embarking on a life of crime; programs and policies designed to ameliorate the social conditions and institutions that influence offending; and the modification or manipulation of the physical environment, products, or systems to reduce everyday opportunities for crime. Each strategy aims at preventing crime or criminal offending in the first instance - before the act has been committed. Each, importantly, takes place outside of the formal criminal justice system, representing an alternative, perhaps even socially progressive way to reduce crime. The Oxford Handbook of Crime Prevention is a comprehensive, up-to-date, and authoritative review of research on crime prevention. Bringing together top scholars in criminology, public policy, psychology, and sociology, this Handbook includes critical reviews of the main theories that form the basis of crime prevention, evidence-based assessments of the effectiveness of the most important interventions, and cross-cutting essays that examine implementation, evaluation methodology, and public policy.
 
Covering the three major crime prevention strategies active today-developmental, community, and situational-this definitive volume addresses seriously and critically the ways in which the United States and the Western world have attempted, and should continue to strive for the prevention of crime.

Preface
Contributors
1. Crime Prevention and Public Policy
Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington
PART I: Developmental Crime Prevention
2. Developmental and Life-Course Theories of Offending
Francis T. Cullen, Michael L. Benson, and Matthew D. Makarios
3. Risk and Protective Factors for Offending
David P. Farrington, Rolf Loeber, and Maria M. Ttofi
4. Preventing Crime through Intervention in the Preschool Years
Holly S. Schindler and Hirokazu Yoshikawa
5. Parent Training and the Prevention of Crime
Alex R. Piquero and Wesley G. Jennings
6. Child Skills Training in the Prevention of Antisocial Development and Crime
Friedrich Lösel and Doris Bender
7. Developmental Approaches in the Prevention of Female Offending
Deborah Gorman-Smith and Alana M. Vivolo
PART II: Community Crime Prevention
8. Community-Level Influences on Crime and Offending
Steven F. Messner and Gregory M. Zimmerman
9. Disorder and Crime
Wesley G. Skogan
10. Poverty Deconcentration and the Prevention of Crime
Jens Ludwig and Julia Burdick-Will
11. Peer Influence, Mentoring, and the Prevention of Crime
Christopher J. Sullivan and Darrick Jolliffe
12. Comprehensive Community Partnerships for Preventing Crime
Dennis P. Rosenbaum and Amie M. Schuck
13. Community-Based Substance Use Prevention
Abigail A. Fagan and J. David Hawkins
14. School-Based Crime Prevention
Denise C. Gottfredson, Philip J. Cook, and Chongmin Na
PART III: Situational Crime Prevention
15. Situational Crime Prevention: Classifying Techniques Using 'Good Enough' Theory
Martha J. Smith and Ronald V. Clarke
16. High Crime Places, Times, and Offenders
Anthony A. Braga
17. Crime Displacement and Diffusion of Benefits
Shane D. Johnson, Rob T. Guerette, and Kate J. Bowers
18. Place-Based Crime Prevention: Theory, Evidence, and Policy
John E. Eck and Rob T. Guerette
19. The Private Sector and Designing Products against Crime
Paul Ekblom
20. Once Bitten, Twice Shy? Repeat Victimization and its Prevention
Louise Grove and Graham Farrell
PART IV: Advancing Knowledge and Building a Safer Society
21. Implementing Crime Prevention: Good Governance and a Science of Implementation
Ross Homel and Peter Homel
22. The Importance of Randomized Experiments in Evaluating Crime Prevention
David Weisburd and Joshua C. Hinkle
23. Preventing Future Criminal Activities of Delinquents and Offenders
Doris Layton MacKenzie
24. Public Opinion and Crime Prevention: A Review of International Trends
Julian V. Roberts and Ross Hastings
25. The Science and Politics of Crime Prevention: Toward a New Crime Policy
Brandon C. Welsh and David P. Farrington
Index

The Authors

Brandon C. Welsh, Associate Professor, College of Criminal Justice, Northeastern University, and David P. Farrington, Professor of Psychological Criminology, Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University
Brandon C. Welsh is an Associate Professor of Criminology at Northeastern University and Senior Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement. David P. Farrington is Professor of Psychological Criminology in the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University. He is a former president of the American Society of Criminology, the British Society of Criminology, and the European Association of Psychology and Law.

Contributors:

Michael L. Benson is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.
Kate J. Bowers is a Reader in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London.
Anthony A. Braga is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University and a Senior Research Fellow in the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at Harvard University.
Julia Burdick-Will is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago.
Ronald V. Clarke is University Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.
Philip J. Cook is ITT/Sanford Professor of Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.
Francis T. Cullen is Distinguished Research Professor of Criminal Justice and Sociology at the University of Cincinnati.
John E. Eck is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.
Paul Ekblom is Professor of Design Against Crime at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design at University of the Arts London.
Abigail A. Fagan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of South Carolina.
Graham Farrell is a Professor of Criminology at Loughborough University and a Visiting Professor in the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University.
David P. Farrington is Professor of Psychological Criminology in the Institute of Criminology at Cambridge University.
Deborah Gorman-Smith is a Research Fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.
Denise C. Gottfredson is a Professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland at College Park.
Louise Grove is a Lecturer in Criminology at Loughborough University.
Rob T. Guerette is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice in the School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University.
Ross Hastings is a Professor of Criminology and Director of the Institute for the Prevention of Crime at the University of Ottawa.
J. David Hawkins is an Endowed Professor of Prevention in the Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, at the University of Washington.
Joshua C. Hinkle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Georgia State University.
Ross Homel is Foundation Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Griffith University.
Peter Homel is Research Manager for Crime Reduction and Analysis for the Australian Institute of Criminology and Adjunct Professor at Griffith University.
Wesley G. Jennings is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology at the University of South Florida.
Darrick Jolliffe is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Criminology at the University of Leicester.
Shane D. Johnson is a Reader in the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London.
Rolf Loeber is Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Professor of Psychology and Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh, and Professor of Juvenile Delinquency and Social Development at Free University of Amsterdam.
Friedrich Lösel is Director of and a Professor in the Institute of Criminology at Cambridge University.
Jens Ludwig is McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law, and Public Policy at the University of Chicago.
Doris Layton MacKenzie is a Professor in the Crime, Law, and Justice Program and Director of the Justice Centre for Research at Pennsylvania State University.
Matthew D. Makarios is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.
Steven F. Messner is Distinguished Teaching Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, State University of New York.
Chongmin Na is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland at College Park.
Alex R. Piquero is a Professor in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida State University and an Adjunct Professor in the Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice, and Governance at Griffith University.
Julian V. Roberts is a Professor in the Centre for Criminology at Oxford University.
Dennis P. Rosenbaum is a Professor of Criminology and Psychology and Director of the Center for Research in Law and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Holly S. Schindler is a Project Director at Harvard University's Center on the Developing Child and a Lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Amie M. Schuck is an Associate Professor and Head of the Department of Criminology, Law, and Justice at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
Wesley G. Skogan is a Professor of Political Science and a member of the research faculty of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University.
Martha J. Smith is an Associate Professor in the School of Community Affairs at Wichita State University.
Christopher J. Sullivan is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.
Maria M. Ttofi is Leverhulme and Newton Trust Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute of Criminology at Cambridge University.
Alana M. Vivolo is a Public Health Advisor and Project Officer in the Division of Violence Prevention at the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.
David Weisburd is Walter E. Meyer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at the Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law at The Hebrew University, and a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at George Mason University.
Brandon C. Welsh is an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University and Senior Research Fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement.
Hirokazu Yoshikawa is a Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Gregory M. Zimmerman is an Assistant Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University.
Doris Bender is a Senior Lecturer in the Institute of Psychology at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at

More Details of The Oxford Handbook of Crime Prevention on the Oxford University website


The Oxford Handbook of Criminology
Edition: 5th
Format: Paperback
Author: Edited by Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan, and Robert Reiner
ISBN: 978-0-19-959027-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £37.99
Publication Date: 12th April 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The most comprehensive and authoritative single volume guide to criminology
Brings together contributions from leading academics detailing the relevant theory, recent research, policy developments, and current debates, enabling students to fully appreciate the diverse array of viewpoints in criminological discourse
Includes detailed references enabling readers to further research the topics discussed
Features an extensive online resource centre providing additional teaching and learning materials for both students and lecturers

New to this edition

Features completely new chapters on:
The state of modern criminology
Public views about crime and justice
Youth crime and justice
Developmental and life-course criminology
The organisation of serious crimes for gain
Terrorism and counter-terrorism
State crime and human rights
Community sanctions
Out-of-court decisions: cautions, fixed penalties, breach, parole
The most comprehensive and authoritative single volume text on the subject, the fifth edition of the acclaimed Oxford Handbook of Criminology combines masterly reviews of all the key topics with extensive references to aid further research.
 
In addition to the history of the discipline and reviews of different theoretical perspectives, the book provides up-to-date reviews of such diverse topics as public views about crime and justice, youth crime and justice and state crime and human rights.
 
The fifth edition has been substantially revised and updated so that it covers topics being taught at undergraduate level as well as encapsulating the latest developments in the academic and practical spheres of criminology, including reflections on the August 2011 riots. An impressive line-up of contributors, experts in their respective fields, means the Oxford Handbook of Criminology will continue to be an essential purchase for all students and teachers of criminology and an indispensable resource for professionals.

Online Resource Centre

Selected chapters from previous editions
Details about the contributors
Guidance on answering essay questions
Essay questions
Selected further reading
Web links
Figures and tables from the text

Contents

Criminology: History and Theory
1: Ian Loader & Richard Sparks: Situating criminology: On the production and consumption of knowledge about crime and justice
2: Paul Rock: Sociological theories of crime
3: Clive R. Hollin: Criminological psychology
4: Keith Hayward & Jock Young: Cultural criminology
5: David Nelken: Comparing criminal justice
Social Constructions of Crime and Crime Control
6: Nicola Lacey & Lucia Zedner: Legal constructions of crime
7: David Downes & Rod Morgan: Overtaking on the left? The politics of law and order in the 'Big Society'
8: Mike Maguire: Criminal statistics and the construction of crime
9: Chris Greer & Robert Reiner: Mediated mayhem: media, crime, criminal justice
10: Mike Hough & Julian V. Roberts: Public opinion, crime, and criminal justice
Dimensions of Crime
11: Robert Reiner: Casino capital's crimes: political economy, crime, and criminal justice
12: Frances Heidensohn & Marisa Silvestri: Gender and crime
13: Coretta Phillips & Ben Bowling: Ethnicities, racism, crime, and criminal justice
14: Carolyn Hoyle: Victims, the criminal process, and restorative justice
15: Jill Peay: Mentally disordered offenders, mental health, and crime
16: Anthony Bottoms: Developing socio-spatial criminology
17: Rod Morgan & Tim Newburn: Youth crime and justice: rediscovering devolution, discretion, and diversion?
18: Lesly McAra & Susan McVie: Critical debates in developmental and life-course criminology
Forms of Crime
19: Fiona Brookman & Amanda Robinson: Violent crime
20: Michael Levi: The organization of serious crimes for gain
21: David Nelken: White-collar and corporate crime
22: Martin Innes & Michael Levi: Terrorism and counter-terrorism
23: Fiona Measham & Nigel South: Drugs, alcohol, and crime
24: Penny Green & Tony Ward: State crime: a dialectical view
Reactions to Crime
25: Trevor Jones: Governing security: pluralization, privatization, and polarization in crime control and policing
26: Adam Crawford & Karen Evans: Crime prevention and community safety
27: Tim Newburn & Robert Reiner: Policing and the police
28: Andrew Sanders & Richard Young: From suspect to trial
29: Andrew Ashworth & Julian Roberts: Sentencing: theory, principle, and practice
30: Alison Liebling & Ben Crewe: Prison life, penal power, and prison effects
31: Peter Raynor: Community penalties, probation, and offender management
32: Nicola Padfield, Rod Morgan & Mike Maguire: Out of court, out of sight? Criminal sanctions and non-judicial decision-making
33: Friedrich Losel: Offender treatment and rehabilitation: what works?

Reviews

"'... quite simply an outstanding achievement... the only text that is authoritative, comprehensive and serious enough to be the basis of an entire course in criminology.'" - Professor Stan Cohen, The British Journal of Criminology

"'It will define undergraduate and postgraduate criminology courses for some time to come...'" - Criminal Justice Matters

"'A comprehensive introduction to criminology written by the leading figures of the discipline; no other text covers the same range of topics in this depth'" - Dr Michael Fiddler, Lecturer in Criminology, University of Greenwich

"'A classic. An essential for any student of criminology.'" - Kevin Brown, Lecturer in Law, Newcastle University

"'The essential text for criminology. Combines detailed introductions to a wide range of topics with some of the smartest writing around.'" - Iain Brennan, Lecturer, Hull University


More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at



Evidence
Edition: 3rd
Format: Paperback
Author: Andrew Choo
ISBN: 978-0-19-960115-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £28.99
Publication Date: 12th April 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Provides a concise and lucid account of the key principles that underlie the law of evidence, helping students to develop a full, analytical understanding of the subject.
The author's highly engaging and accessible writing style leads the students accurately and clearly through this complex subject.
Accompanied by a helpful Online Resource Centre that provides regular updates to the text and web links for students.
New to this third edition
Takes into account, and engages fully with, the major developments in the relevant case law, including R v Horncastle (UK Supreme Court) and Al-Khawaja and Tahery v UK (European Court of Human Rights; judgment of the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights pending)
Discusses the Law Commission's recent work on the admissibility of expert evidence in criminal proceedings, ensuring that students are up to date with the latest developments in this important area
Includes coverage of the reforms to the law on special measures for vulnerable and intimidated witnesses contained in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
Choo's Evidence provides students with a lucid account of the core principles of the law of civil and criminal evidence in England and Wales, thus equipping them with a sound understanding of why the law has developed in the way that it has.
 
This clear and engaging text explores current debates and draws on different jurisdictions to achieve a fascinating mix of critical and thought-provoking analysis for students and practitioners of the law of evidence. Thorough consideration is given to all areas of contemporary concern, particularly the ongoing implications of the Human Rights At 1998 and the Criminal Justice Act 2003.
 
Evidence is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre, which provides essential updates to the text and a helpful list of web links.
Readership: Undergraduate law students studying optional modules on the law of evidence, and trainee barristers studying the BPTC.

Contents
1.: Introduction
2.: Burden and standard of proof
3.: The course of evidence
4.: Confessions
5.: The right to silence and the privilege against self-incrimination
6.: Identification evidence
7.: Investigatory impropriety: violations of the ECHR and undercover police operations
8.: Public interest immunity and related matters
9.: Legal professional privilege
10.: Character evidence
11.: Hearsay evidence
12.: Expert evidence
13.: Witnesses
14.: Proof without evidence

The Author

Andrew Choo is Professor of English Law at Brunel University, London and a barrister at Matrix Chambers. He is a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Evidence and Proof.

A Review

“A very useful book....one of the first sources I look at, and recommended to students, in relation to the law of Evidence”, Dr Colin King


Preface

Like the first two editions, this edition of Evidence seeks to provide an appropriately contemporary perspective on the law of evidence in England and Wales. The book attempts to cover the main topics in evidence law, but in doing so to focus on issues of contemporary concern rather than to achieve a comprehensive treatment of all relevant doctrinal principles. When discussing case law, I frequently allow quotations of clear-and pithy judicial statements to 'speak for themselves'. Throughout the book I attempt where appropriate to draw on comparative material and a variety of socio-legal, empirical, and non-legal, such as psychological, material. I provide in the footnotes a large number of references which may be used as a guide to further reading and research. For the first time in this edition, a selective list of further reading is also provided at the end of each chapter.

I generally stopped collecting new material after early October 2011, and shall check website references immediately before returning the corrected first proofs in early January 2012.

In relation to two matters of case citation on which practice is not uniform, I have followed the recommendations made in the 4th edition (2011) of the Oxford Standard for the Citation of Legal Authorities (`OSCOLA'). The first recommendation is this: 'Give the year of judgment (not publication) in round brackets when the volumes of the law report series are independently numbered, so that the year of publication is not needed to find the volume.' The second is this: 'In some specialist law reports, cases are given case numbers which run consecutively through the volumes, rather than page numbers.... In such cases, follow the citation method used by the series in question.'

Once again, I would like to express my thanks to my commissioning editor, Tom Young, for his assistance and encouragement, and to Susan Faircloth for sympathetic copy-editing. In the summer of 2011, as work on this edition was progressing, I left the Law School of the University of Warwick, where I had spent five-and-a-half years, for my present post. I would like to take this opportunity to thank my colleagues at Warwick for making my time there an enjoyable one. In particular, Andy Roberts (now of the Law School of the University of Melbourne) generously shared ideas and material with me, as indeed he continues to do. Over the past six months or so several friends became aware of my tendency, whether the setting be a café, pub, restaurant, or even football stadium, to assail them with details of the many hours of my time that 'the book' was consuming. I am grateful to all of them, especially those London-based such as Neil Robinson, Susan Nash, and Vijay Sachidanand, for their forbearance.

I write this as I return to London following a visit to Australia for a celebration of my father's 80th birthday, and must once again record my enormous gratitude to my family for their continued support.

ALTC
Sydney Airport Terminal 1
13 November 2011

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at



Civil Liability for Animals
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Peter North
ISBN: 978-0-19-960081-6
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £49.95
Publication Date: 12 January 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The only book to address harm done by animals (as opposed to harm done to animals)
A comprehensive resource covering both dangerous and non-dangerous species
Contains the primary material text of the Animals Act 1971, as amended
Written by an internationally renowned legal scholar
A comprehensive analysis of liability for animals this book covers harm done by dangerous and straying animals including both dangerous and non-dangerous species. Including a separate chapter on special provisions relating to dogs it provides unique guidance from an internationally renowned legal scholar. The book takes account of the decisions of the courts which have applied, interpreted and explained the Animals Act 1971 over the past four decades including the House of Lords decision in Mirvahedy v Henley (2003).
 
Liability for animals which are not members of a dangerous species but which, in the event, may have been proved to be dangerous is a matter of particular interest and concern. The book addresses matters such as harm done by animals in the course of hunting as well as decisions on a number of non-statutory aspects of the law of animals.
 
The book includes the primary material of the Animals Act, 1971 making it a comprehensive point of reference on this subject.
 
An earlier version of this book was published in 1972 just after the Animals Act 1971 came into force. Although the legislation has remained substantially unamended, there has been a steady flow of case law on the meaning and operation of the provisions of the Act.
Readership: Primary: Solicitors and barristers practising in the area of civil liability and in particular those advising farming and land owning communities as well as house owners, also of relevance to the judiciary. Secondary: Academic libraries and scholars or tort law.

Contents

1: Introduction
2: Strict Liability for Dangerous Animals
3: Statutory Liability for Straying Livestock
4: Fencing and Straying Animals
5: Animals and the Highway
6: General Liability at Common Law
7: Special Provisions Relating to Dogs
Appendix
The Animals Act 1971

Reviews to Date

"North should be the first source of any practitioner with a case on liability for animals. The book is exhaustive, authoritative, a model of clarity and elegantly written." - WVH Rogers, School of Law, University of Nottingham

The Author

Peter North, Former Door Tenant, Essex Court, Former Principal of Jesus College and Vice Chancellor, University of Oxford
Sir Peter North, Formerly Principal of Jesus College, University of Oxford, is the Editor of Cheshire North & Fawcett: Private International Law (OUP, 2008) and an internationally renowned legal scholar.

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at



Public Order: Law and Practice
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Authors: John Beggs QC, George Thomas, and Susanna Rickard
Consultant Editor: Michael Messinger
ISBN: 978-0-19-922797-6
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £29.99
Publication Date: 26th Jan 2012

Publisher's Title Information

Offers practical, straightforward advice on public order offences from drunken brawls and domestic disturbances to direct action and the threat of terrorism
Written in a practical and accessible style, making complex legislation and case law easy to understand
Includes guidance on the practical measures to take when planning, briefing, and giving evidence on public order operations
How can police officers engaged in public order policing ensure they act lawfully, secure safe criminal convictions, avoid civil claims and, perhaps most importantly, maintain the peace? Tackling one of the most difficult areas of modern day policing, Public Order: Law and Practice presents practical, straightforward advice that is grounded in the letter of the law, helping police officers to make decisions under pressure and take control of potentially volatile situations.
 
Topics covered range from day-to-day problems such as drunken brawls and football offences to more serious issues such as violent protest and terrorism, providing you with the full spectrum of possible encounters and highlighting transferable skills. The book contains many useful practical features including definition boxes for commonly-used terms, and case studies and scenarios. Key points and best practices are summarised throughout the chapters, helping you to absorb the information and providing for a practical quick reference. Throughout, the authors offer you tips for dealing with both the common and less common in public order policing, while taking account of the latest case law and legislation.
 
This book is part of the Blackstone's Practical Policing Series. The series consists of practical guides containing clear and detailed explanations of the relevant legislation, accompanied by practical scenarios, illustrative diagrams and useful checklists.
Readership: Police officers of every rank who have to deal with public order situations, including specialist public order police officers (e.g. public order commanders and tactical advisors), public order trainers and those attending the National Public Order Commanders and Tactical Advisor Courses. Will also appeal to barristers and solicitors acting for and against the police, as well as judges, policing students and local authorities.

Contents

Foreword by Sue Sim. Chief Constable of Northumbria Police and ACPO Lead on Public Order
1: Getting it Right
2: Human Rights
3: Breach of the Peace
4: Offences Against Public Order
5: Processions, Assemblies and Demonstrations
6: Professional Protest and Direct Action
7: Race, Religion and Sexual Orientation: Hate Crime and Public Order
8: Terrorism
9: Unlawful Use of Land
10: Football Violence

Reviews to Date

"This is one of the most useful I have ever read. It is extremely well-researched and structured with the opportunity for the reader to make notes after every chapter together with references for further reading. I spent 28 years on the PSU, this book should be essential reader for all Public Order trainers, and PSU commanders particularly during the planning stage." - Paul Richards, Lecturer in Police Studies, University of Plymouth

Foreword

The police response to incidents of protest, events such as football, and public disorder has always been subject to scrutiny by the public. Historically, the breaching of the peace was the point when action was taken. However, as society and the law have changed, it is important that there is a clear understanding of the legal framework that underpins the options for action at all command levels and by staff on the ground. As the Association of Chief Police Officers lead for Public Order and Public Safety, I welcome this book, which provides a single reference source for the various pieces of legislation in what has become an increasingly complex arena.

I have known of John Beggs by reputation for many years. An often heard description of him as 'outstanding' and 'providing clear and concise views' is clearly merited not only from the cases he has been involved in but also from personal knowledge in more recent times. Public Order: Law and Practice is readily understandable and provides an illustration of the breadth of areas that can result in disorder and how the legislation should be interpreted. The more recent increase in protest, whether in relation to the use of land or single issue, is covered by separate chapters. These chapters not only outline the relevant legislation, but also include the practical interpretation by citing examples and case studies. Whilst some legislation is utilised on a regular basis by officers, this book also covers that which clearly isn't; for example, Section 9(2) Criminal Law Act 1977, concerning trespassing on land such as a foreign embassy. Public Order: Law and Practice provides a 'one stop shop' as a guide on public order legislation and should prove to be an invaluable tool for practitioners at all levels.

Sue Sim
Chief Constable, Northumbria Police
ACPO Lead for Public Order and Public Safety
November 2011

More Information can be found at the Oxford University Website at



The Ethics of Plea Bargaining
Edition: 1st
Format: Hardback
Author: Richard L Lippke
ISBN: 978-0-19-964146-8
Publishers: Oxford University Press
Price: £60
Publication Date: 20th Oct 2011

Publisher's Title Information

Presents the first extended analysis of the normative arguments underlying the morality of plea bargaining
Integrates philosophical and legal materials on plea bargaining and legal punishment, situating plea bargaining within the framework of larger criminal justice practices
Draws on a comparative study of different plea bargaining practices in the US, UK, and Europe
Suggests reforms to the current plea bargaining systems, outlining the case for its continuation in a revised and restrained fashion
The practice of plea bargaining plays a hugely significant role in the adjudication of criminal charges and has provoked intense debate about its legitimacy. This book offers the first full-length philosophical analysis of the ethics of plea bargaining. It develops a sustained argument for restrained forms of the practice and against the free-wheeling versions that predominate in the United States.
 
In countries that have endorsed plea bargains, such as the United States, upwards of ninety percent of criminal defendants plead guilty rather than go to trial. Yet trials, which grant a presumption of innocence to defendants and place a substantial burden of proof on the state to establish guilt, are widely regarded as the most appropriate mechanisms for fairly and accurately assigning criminal sanctions. How is it that many countries have abandoned the formal rules and rigorous standards of public trials in favor of informal and veiled negotiations between state officials and criminal defendants concerning the punishment to which the latter will be subjected? More importantly, how persuasive are the myriad justifications that have been provided for plea bargaining? These are the questions addressed in this book.
 
Examining the legal processes by which individuals are moved through the criminal justice system, the fairness of those processes, and the ways in which they reproduce social inequality, this book offers an ethical argument for restrained forms of plea bargaining. It also provides a comparison between the different plea bargaining regimes that exist within the US, where it is well-established, England and Wales, where the practice is coming under considerable critique, and the European Union, where debate continues on whether it coheres with inquisitorial legal regimes. It suggests that rewards for admitting guilt are distinguished from penalties for exercising the right to trial, and argues for modest, fixed sentence reductions for defendants who admit their guilt. These suggestions for reform include discouraging the current practice of deliberate over-charging by prosecutors and charge bargaining, and require judges to scrutinize more closely the evidence against those accused of crimes before any guilty pleas are entered by them. Arguing that the negotiation of charges and sentences should remain the exception, not the rule, it nevertheless puts forward a normative defense for the reform and retention of the plea bargaining system.

Contents

Introduction
1: Waiver Rewards and Trial Penalties
2: Against Trial Penalties
3: Waiver Rewards and Deserved Punishment
4: Remorse and Waiver Rewards
5: Waiver Rewards and the Reduction of Crime
6: Rewarding Cooperation
7: Plea Bargains as Contracts
8: Principled Criminal Prosecution and Half-Loaves
9: Plea Bargaining and Getting at the Truth
Epilogue

The Author

Richard L. Lippke is a Senior Scholar in the Department of Criminal Justice at Indiana University. In addition to his current position, he has held teaching positions at James Madison University and DePauw University, and has been a visiting fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at Australian National University and the Centre for Criminology at Oxford University. He is the author of Rethinking Imprisonment (OUP 2007), Radical Business Ethics (Rowman & Littlefield 1995), and numerous articles in applied ethics and philosophy of criminal law.

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