BOOK REVIEWS PROVIDED BY - Rob Jerrard LLB LLM (London)

INTERNET LAW BOOK REVIEWS

NEW POLICE BOOKSHOP (East Yorkshire (Books for Police Officers)

All books to Rob Jerrard Please

Title The Custody Officers Companion, 2nd Edition

Author Stewart Calligan and Paul Harper

Revised 2nd Edition, Reprinted august 1998.

Publisher The New Police Bookshop. (East Yorks)

Price £16.50

Cover SB

Having a copy of this book in the custody office could prove entertaining - the graphics could keep you amused for hours. As the cartoon on page 60 implies, (A skeleton reading a copy of the Codes) very few prisoners exercise their right to read the codes in full.

That aside, this is a "handy" book about a difficult subject deserves a place in every custody officers pocket; pocket because that is where it will fit.

Your Reviewer, like the authors served as a custody officer before and after PACE and, as a review officer. In pre-PACE, pre-computer days sergeants did accept charges and many found it necessary to accumulate various books and aids to assist them.

This 2nd Edition takes account of the changes made by the Criminal Justice Act 1994 and the revised Codes of Practice which came into force 10 April 1995.

If you are required to carry out the duties of custody officer/review officer, or even studying for promotion, consider a copy. It is essential in all instances that you be up-to date with PACE and the Codes. Law books are expensive, this one gives good value for money.



Points to prove

Stewart Calligan 0 85164 066 4

1997 Soft cover £13.50

Since the pupose of this book may not be clear to all the following explanation is given by the author Stewart Calligan.

A combination of this book along with a copy of "Summonses & Charges" by Jack English would prove 'HOW TO USE THE LAW FOR PRACTITIONERS'

"Simplicity is an aid to learning. With this statement in mind. the author has chosen some 75 offences which can he found in the Police Summons and Charges lists and in the Magistrates' Court Sheets on most days of the week.

Less common offences have not been included and this simplification has allowed him to spend more time on the type of offences you are likely to be concerned with. The main problems encountered by people dealing with the detection, prosecution and the defence of offences are:

(A)what are the POINTS TO PROVE

(B)What do the points mean and

(C)How are the points PROVIDED or DISPROVED.

In some of the offences the author has added a further heading of

(D)Supporting Evidence, where other important matters are explained.

(A)Shows the correctly worded Summons or Charge. called POINTS TO PROVE.

Each offence has been divided into its different elements. all of which have to be proved beyond all reasonable doubt for a successful prosecution. (B)and (C) headings are drawn from legislation. case decisions and the normal practice of magistrates' courts.

Section 1 of the book deals Traffic. section 2 with Crime, and section 3 with Miscellaneous Offences. A glossary is provided for the Traffic Offences at the beginning of section 1 of the book.

This edition covers the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 which produced several new offences, computer-held information. drugs. bilking. vehicle interference. counterfeit notes and coins and the new common assault charge Case law. Statute law and procedures have been updated where necessary'"


How to USE the law for practitionersí

Simplicity is an aid to learning. With this statement in mind, the author has chosen some 70 offences which can be found in the Police Summons and Charges lists and in the Magistratesí Court Sheets on most days of the week across the country. Less common offences have not been included and this simplification has allowed him to spend more time on the type of offences you are likely to be concerned with.
The main problems encountered by people dealing with the detection, prosecution and the defence of offences are:
(A) What are the POINTS TO PROVE
(B) What do the points MEAN and
(C) How are the points PROVED or DISPROVED. In some of the offences the author has added a further heading of
(D) Supporting Evidence, where other important matters are explained.

LINKS