"INTERNET LAW BOOK REVIEWS" - Provided by Rob Jerrard LLB LLM


Books from the Council of Europe Publishing Reviewed in 2012

Livres du Conseil de l'Europe Edition révisée en 2012
The Council of Europe has 47 member states, covering virtually the entire continent of Europe. It seeks to develop common democratic and legal principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights and other reference texts on the protection of individuals. Ever since it was founded in 1949, in the aftermath of the Second World War, the Council of Europe has symbolised reconciliation.

Council of Europe Publishing produces works in all the Organisation's spheres of reference, including human rights, legal science (constitutional law, criminal law, family law, labour law etc.), health, ethics, social affairs, environment, education, culture, sport, youth and architectural heritage.


Le Conseil de l'Europe dispose de 47 états membres, couvrant pratiquement tout le continent de l'Europe. Il vise à développer démocratique commune et les principes juridiques sur la base de la Convention européenne sur les droits humains et autres textes de référence sur la protection des individus. Depuis qu'il a été fondée en 1949, dans le sillage de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, le Conseil de l'Europe a symbolisé réconciliation.

Conseil de l'Europe produit des ouvres dans toutes les sphères de l'Organisation de référence, y compris les droits de l'homme, la science juridique (droit constitutionnel, droit pénal, droit de la famille, droit du travail etc), la santé, l'éthique, des affaires sociales, environnement, éducation, culture, sport , les jeunes et le patrimoine architectural.

Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings and explanatory report, Warsaw (Poland), 16.V.2005, CETS No. 197 (2013)
Convention du Conseil de l'Europe sur la lutte contre la traite des êtres humains et rapport explicatif, Varsovie (Pologne), 16.V.2005, STCE no. 197 (2013)
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback A5
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7547-2
Publishers: 978-92-871-7547-2
Price: € 8 / US$ 16
Publication Date: 2012

Publisher's Title Information

This Convention aims to prevent trafficking in human beings, protect victims of trafficking and prosecute traffickers. Its comprehensive scope of application encompasses all forms of trafficking (whether national or transnational, linked or not to organised crime) and covers all victims of trafficking (women, men and children) as well as all forms of exploitation. With an emphasis on the human rights of victims of trafficking, the Convention contains measures to ensure the proper identification of victims, their assistance and protection as well as their compensation. It also contains measures to ensure the effective investigation and prosecution of traffickers. In addition, it sets out measures to promote international co-operation and partnerships with civil society. Finally, it provides for a mechanism to monitor compliance with the obligations it contains.

This title is also available in French

Cette convention vise à prévenir la traite des êtres humains, à protéger les victimes de la traite et à poursuivre les trafiquants. Son champ d'application est global, couvrant toutes formes de traite (nationale ou transnationale, liée ou non à la criminalité organisée) ainsi que toutes personnes victimes de la traite (hommes, femmes et enfants) et toutes formes d'exploitation. Mettant l'accent sur les droits humains des victimes de la traite, la convention contient des mesures visant à assurer une bonne identification des victimes, leur assistance et protection ainsi que leur indemnisation. Concernant les trafiquants, elle prévoit des mesures visant à assurer des enquêtes et des poursuites efficaces. En outre, elle vise à promouvoir la coopération internationale et des partenariats avec la société civile. Enfin, elle prévoit un mécanisme de suivi pour évaluer le respect des obligations qu'elle contient.


More Details on The Council of Europe Website



European Convention on Extradition and Protocols to the said Convention - Council of Europe Treaty Series Nos. 24, 86, 98, 209, 212 (2012)
Convention européenne d'extradition et protocoles à ladite Convention - Série des traités du Conseil de l'Europe n° 24, 86, 98, 209, 212 (2012)
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback A4
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7565-6
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 23 / US$ 46
Publication Date: 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The Council of Europe Treaty Series (CETS) contains the official versions of all the conventions and agreements adopted within the Council of Europe, numbered in the chronological order of their opening for signature. The date on the cover of the publication is that of the opening of the treaty for signature.
 
The chart of signatures and ratifications of Council of Europe treaties is available free of charge on the website of the Treaty Office of the Council: http://conventions.coe.int.

This is in French & English

More Details on The Council of Europe Website


Human Rights of Roma and Travellers in Europe (2012)
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7200-6
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 15 / US$ 30
Publication Date: 2012

Publisher's Title Information

In many European countries, the Roma and Traveller populations are still denied basic human rights and suffer blatant racism. They remain far behind others in terms of educational achievement, employment, housing and health standards, and they have virtually no political representation.
 
Anti-Gypsyism continues to be widespread and is compounded by a striking lack of knowledge among the general population about the history of repression of Roma in Europe. In times of economic crisis, the tendency to direct frustration against scapegoats increases - and Roma and Travellers appear to be easy targets.
 
This report presents the first overview of the human rights situation of Roma and Travellers, covering all 47 member states of the Council of Europe. Its purpose is to encourage a constructive discussion about policies towards Roma and Travellers in Europe today, focusing on what must be done in order to put an end to the discrimination and marginalisation they suffer.

Contents

Foreword
Summary
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. Anti-Gypsyism
1.1. Public leaders and anti-Gypsy rhetoric
1.2. Extremist groups
1.3. Media
1.4. Promotion of hatred on the Internet
1.5. Anti-Gypsyism and recognition of the genocide of the Roma during the Second
World War
2. Racially motivated violence against Roma and Travellers
3. Treatment of Roma and Travellers by law enforcement and judicial authorities
3.1. Police abuse of Roma and Travellers
3.2. Roma and Travellers in the justice systems of Europe
4. Respect for private and family life of Roma and Travellers
4.1. Forced and coercive sterilisations of Roma women
4.2. Removal of Roma children from the care of their biological parents
4.3. Common law and customary marriage among certain Roma groups
5. Roma and trafficking in human beings
6. Enjoyment by Roma and Travellers of economic and social rights
6.1. The right to education
6.2. Access to adequate housing
6.3. Access to employment
6.4. The right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health
6.5. The right to social security
6.6. Access to goods, services and public places
7. Statelessness and gaps in personal documentation of Roma
7.1. Lack of personal identification documents
7.2. Statelessness in the context of state succession and transformation of the citizenship regime
8. Enjoyment by Roma and Travellers of freedom of movement and international protection inside and outside the state territory
8.1. Free movement within a territory
8.2. International protection and internal displacement
8.3. Collective and individual expulsion
8.4. Exercise of freedom of movement by Roma and Travellers in the European Union
9. Participation of Roma and Travellers in public life and decision-making processes
9.1. Registration and exercise of the right to vote
9.2. Representation in elected bodies
9.3. Representation in consultation mechanisms
9.4. Representation in civil service
Conclusions
Bibliography

More Details on The Council of Europe Website


Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence and explanatory report, Istanbul (Turkey)
Edition: 11.V.2011, CETS No. 210 (2012)
Format: Paperback A5
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7203-7
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 8 / US$ 16
Publication Date: 2011
Titre également disponible en anglais
Publication Date: 2011

Publisher's Title Information

The Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (CETS No. 210) is the first legally binding instrument to address violence against women and domestic violence in Europe. It contains a wide range of obligations aiming to prevent violence, protect its victims, prosecute the perpetrators, implement co-ordinated policies and promote international co-operation. It also envisages a monitoring mechanism. The convention recognises violence against women as a violation of human rights and is a major step forward in achieving gender equality in law and in fact.
This title is also available in French

More Details on The Council of Europe Website

Definition and development of human rights and popular sovereignty in Europe (Science and technique of democracy No. 49) (2011)
Edition: 2011
Format: Paperback
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7134-4
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 23 / US$ 46
Publication Date: 2011

Publisher's Title Information

What role do the people play in defining and developing human rights?
 
This volume explores the very topical issue of the lack of democratic legitimisation of national and international courts and the question of whether rendering the original process of defining human rights more democratic at the national and international level would improve the degree of protection they afford.
 
The authors venture to raise the crucial question: When can a democratic society be considered to be mature enough so as to be trusted to provide its own definition of human rights obligations?

Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Basic issues
From a gubernative to a deliberative human rights policy definition, and further development of human rights as an act of collective self-determination
The human right to democracy - a moral defence with a legal nuance
The democratic constitution
"From above" or "from the bottom up"? The protection of human rights -between descending and ascending interpretations
Gloomy prospects - seven theories on the future of democracy within a world society
The Council of Europe
Human rights between sovereign will and international standards: a comment
Definition and development of human rights in the international context and popular sovereignty
Human rights and popular sovereignty in the perspective of the Venice Commission
The European Union
Human rights and transfers of sovereignty in the European Union: consequences for the definition and development of human rights
Commentary on Catherine Schneider's report
The European Union Fundamental Rights Agency within the European and international human rights architecture: the legal framework after the entry into force of the Treaty of Lisbon
The national level (examples)
Combining abstract ex ante and concrete ex post review: the Finnish model
Processes of definition and development of human rights besides popular sovereignty: a comment
Judicial review as a substitute for not yet constituted instances of popular sovereignty
Commentary on Peter Paczolay's report

More Details on The Council of Europe Website

Human rights and a changing media landscape (2012
Edition: 1st
Format: Paperback
Author: Foreword by Thomas Hammarberg
ISBN: 978-92-871-7198-6
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 15 / US$ 30
Publication Date: 2012

Publisher's Title Information

The media play a crucial role in the protection of human rights. They expose human rights violations and offer an arena for different voices to be heard in public discourse. Free, independent and pluralistic media are a core element of any democracy. However, the power of the media can also be misused to the extent that the very functioning of democracy is threatened. Some media outlets have been turned into propaganda megaphones for those in power. Others have been used to incite xenophobic hatred and violence against minorities and other vulnerable groups.
 
Now the phenomenon of social media presents us with a range of fresh challenges. Blogs, video and social networking sites have become a key forum for political debate and organisation - so much so that they have provoked counter-responses from some repressive states. While there is a need to ensure better protection of personal integrity in social media, the right to freedom of expression must not be undermined.
 
The purpose of this publication is to contribute to a more thorough discussion on media developments and their impact on human rights in a constantly changing media landscape. Eight experts were invited to contribute their personal assessments of trends and problems. They have not shied away from addressing controversial issues or providing far-reaching suggestions. Together their texts indicate that there is a need for stronger protection of media freedom and freedom of expression in Europe today. These are clearly topics of paramount importance which demand serious public debate.

Contents

Foreword: Media freedom in Europe
Chapter 1: Protection of journalists from violence
Media
Summary
Introduction
Violence against journalists
Legal standards relating to the protection of journalism
Protection of journalists from violence
Conclusions
Chapter 2: Ethical journalism and human rights
Summary
Introduction
Human rights standards relevant for journalism
The new media landscape and the changes for journalism
Threat to free expression: legal restraints on journalism
Ethical journalism -the arguments
Building support for rights and ethics
Chapter 3: Access to official documents
Introduction
The Swedish experience
European Union transparency policies
Societal effects of transparency
Conclusions
Chapter 4: Media pluralism and human rights
Summary
Introduction
Media pluralism: theoretical, legal and historical context
Media pluralism trends in the Council of Europe region
Challenge of monopolies: regulation of media ownership
Further challenges: media more than just a market
Conclusions
Chapter 5: Public service media and human rights
Summary
Introduction
Challenges to public service media today and their impact on the free flow of information and human rights
Rights-based approach to public service media
Initiatives to improve public service media in Europe
Recommendations and conclusions
Chapter 6: Social media and human rights
Summary
Measures that states use to interfere with Internet freedoms and their limitations
Applying human rights and emerging Internet governance standards to political activism and counter-measures on the Internet
Conclusions and recommendations
Acronyms and terms


From the Foreword

The media play an enormously important role in the protection of human rights. They expose human rights violations and offer an arena for different voices to be heard in public discourse. Not without reason, the media have been called the Fourth Estate - an essential addition to the powers of the executive, the legislature and the judiciary. However, the power of the media can also be misused to the extent that the very functioning of democracy is threatened. Some media outlets have been turned into propaganda megaphones for those in power. Others have been used to incite xenophobic hatred and violence against minorities and other vulnerable groups.

The purpose of journalism is not to please those who hold power or to serve as the mouthpiece of governments. Journalists report, investigate and analyse, they inform us about politics, religion, celebrities, the arts, sports, revolutions and wars. They entertain and sometimes annoy us. But most important of all, they are “public watchdogs”. This role is fundamental for democracy. Free, independent and pluralistic media based on freedom of information and expression are a core element of any functioning democracy.

Freedom of the media is also essential for the protection of all other human rights. There are many examples where the misuse of power, corruption, discrimination and even torture have come to light because of the work of investigative journalists. Making the facts known to the public is often the first, essential step in redressing human rights violations and holding those in power accountable.

Public authorities, civil society and the international community, as well as media owners and journalists' organisations, all have important roles to play that reach from law enforcement, education, monitoring and setting universal standards to ethical conduct and self-regulation. The way in which national legislation enshrines media freedom and its practical application by the authorities reveals the state of democracy in the country concerned.

Human rights and a changing media landscape The purpose of this publication is to contribute to a more thorough discussion on various media developments which impact on human rights. Experts were invited to contribute their personal assessments of trends and problems. They were encouraged to raise controversial issues and to provide far-reaching suggestions - also challenging my own views. I would like to thank all eight experts for their high-quality contributions.
The contributions cover: - protection of journalists from violence;
- ethical journalism;
- access to official documents;
- media pluralism and human rights;
- public service media and human rights;
- social media and human rights.

Together these texts give an indication of the level of protection of media freedom and freedom of expression in Europe today. It is clear that these are topics of paramount importance and demand serious public debate. In this foreword I summarise some of the most important aspects of each theme. I also make a number of conclusions concerning each theme. The texts and conclusions all revolve around Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), which concerns freedom of expression:

More Details on The Council of Europe Website


Protecting children from sexual violence - A comprehensive approach
Edition: 2011
Format: Paperback
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-6972-3
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 25 / US$ 50
Publication Date: 2011

Publisher's Title Information

Protecting children from sexual violence - A comprehensive approach is a collection of highly readable expert papers for both child professionals and the general public. It is divided into five parts, presenting a European overview and covering the existing legal frameworks; abuse prevention and reporting; rehabilitation and social reintegration of victims; sexual violence on the Internet; and public and private partnerships against abuse. It also sheds light on the little-known problem of children who are sexually abusing other children.
 
In addition to providing thorough information on the many facets of this complex subject, this publication also highlights new concepts, facts and recommendations. Foremost is the significant lack of data on the prevalence and nature of sexual violence in Europe, underscoring the need for co-ordinated pan-European research and information gathering, which are vital to effective policy making and programme design. It also sounds the alarm for urgent co-ordinated action in various fields to drastically improve child protection through awareness raising; targeted and specialised training, intervention and therapy programmes; sex education in schools; responsible family attitudes; and justice systems with tighter abuse laws and which take account of children's special needs as reliable witnesses.
 
Protecting children from sexual violence is published as part of the Council of Europe campaign to stop sexual violence against children. The hope is that this publication will inspire judges, the police, educators, governments, the media and legislatures to join the campaign and expose, demythify and take concerted action to combat sexual violence against children, a phenomenon that affects as many as 20% of children in Europe.

Contents

Foreword
Part one: The reality of sexual violence against children in Europe and existing legal frameworks
1. Overview of the nature and extent of child sexual abuse in Europe
2. The United Nations legislative framework for the protection of children from sexual violence, including sexual abuse and exploitation
3. Sexual violence against children - The European legislative framework and outline of Council of Europe conventions and European Union policy
Part two: Sexual violence against children - Preventing and reporting
4. Children's participation in policy and practice to prevent child sexual abuse - Developing empowering interventions
5. Towards a child-friendly justice and support for child victims of sexual abuse
6. Against all odds - Communicating about sexual violence
7. Sexual abuse of children with disabilities
8. Preventing and signalling sexual violence against children - Policies and standards for child care in Europe
9. Child helplines as awareness-raising, referral and reporting mechanisms on sexual violence against children
10. Training professionals - An essential strategy for eradicating child sexual abuse
11. The responsibility and co-ordination of professionals in tackling child sexual abuse 12.Teaching children to protect themselves from sexual abuse
13. Sexuality education and the prevention of sexual violence
14. Gathering data on sexual violence against children
15. Preventing sexual violence against children through citizenship and human rights education
Part three: Rehabilitation and social reintegration of child victims, including child perpetrators
16. Recovery services for child victims of sexual violence and their families - What can be offered?
17. Child and adolescent sexual abusers - For a rehabilitative approach driven by scientific evidence
18. Children and young people exhibiting sexually harmful behaviour - What have we learned and what do we need to know to propose effective intervention?
Part four: Sexual violence on the Internet
19. The Internet dimension of sexual violence against children
20. Awareness raising to combat online sexual violence
Part five: Public and private partnerships to eliminate sexual violence against children
21. Engaging the travel and tourism sector in protecting children from sexual exploitation
22.Stop sex trafficking of children and young people - a unique ECPAT and Body Shop campaign
Appendix
Selected Council of Europe conventions and adopted texts

Also available in French

Résumé
« Protéger les enfants centre la violence sexuelle - Une approche globale » propose des articles spécialisés d'une lecture aisée, qui s'adressent aux enfants, aux professionnels concernés et au grand public. L'ouvrage comporte cinq parties : une vue d'ensemble de la situation en Europe et des cadres juridiques en place ; la prévention et le signalement des abus sexuels ; la réhabilitation et la réinsertion sociale des victimes ; la violence sexuelle sur l'internet ; et l'état des partenariats publics et privés dans la lutte contre ce fléau. Ce recueil aborde aussi un problème, moins connu, celui de la violence sexuelle que des enfants font subir à d'autres enfants.
 
Outre les informations précises qu'il fournit sur les multiples facettes d'une question complexe, ce livre attire l'attention sur de nouveaux concepts et de nouvelles réalités, et formule quelques recommandations. Il relève tout particulièrement l'absence de données sur la prévalence et la nature des violences sexuelles en Europe ; il souligne ce faisant la nécessité d'une coordination paneuropéenne de la recherche et collecte d'informations, indispensable à l'élaboration de politiques et de programmes effectifs. Il entend aussi donner l'alerte : la protection des enfants requiert une amélioration drastique et exige d'urgence des mesures coordonnées dans divers domaines, notamment des campagnes de sensibilisation, des formations ciblées spécialisées, des programmes d'intervention et de thérapie, des cours d'éducation sexuelle à l'école, des comportements familiaux responsables et une justice dotée d'un arsenal législatif plus contraignant, qui tienne compte des besoins spéciaux des enfants en tant que témoins fiables.
 
La publication « Protéger les enfants contre la violence sexuelle - Une approche globale » s'inscrit dans le cadre de la Campagne du Conseil de l'Europe contre la violence sexuelle à l'égard des enfants. Espérons qu'elle incitera les juges, la police, les éducateurs, les gouvernements, les medias et les parlements à s'associer à la campagne et à expliquer, démystifier et combattre - par des actions concertées - la violence sexuelle contre les enfants, un phénomène qui, en Europe, concerne environ un enfant sur cinq.
Table des matières
Préface
Première partie : La violence sexuelle contre les enfants en Europe : état des lieux et cadres juridiques
1. Présentation de la nature et de l'ampleur de l'abus sexuel en Europe
2. Le cadre juridique de l'Onu pour la protection des enfants contre la violence sexuelle, y compris les abus sexuels et l'exploitation
3. Les violences sexuelles à l'égard des enfants : le cadre législatif au niveau européen. Présentation des conventions du Conseil de l'Europe et de la politique de l'Union européenne
Deuxième partie : Prévenir et documenter la violence sexuelle contre les enfants
4. La participation des enfants à la conception et à la mise en œuvre des projets de prévention des abus sexuels - Donner aux enfants les moyens
5. Adapter la justice aux enfants, soutenir les enfants victimes de violence sexuelle
6. Envers et contre tout - Comment parler des violences sexuelles ?
7. Les abus sexuels contre les enfants handicapés
8. La prévention et le signalement de la violence sexuelle contre les enfants - Politiques et normes européennes en matière d'aide sociale à l'enfance
9. Des services d'assistance pour lutter contre la violence sexuelle à l'égard des enfants : sensibiliser sur la violence, orienter les enfants et signaler les cas
10. La formation professionnelle - Une stratégie incontournable pour éradiquer l'abus sexuel des enfants
11. Responsabilités et coordination des professionnels face à l'abus sexuel d'enfant
12. Apprendre aux enfants à se protéger contre l'abus sexuel
13. L'éducation sexuelle et la prévention de la violence
14. La collecte de données sur la violence envers les
15. Eduquer à la citoyenneté et aux droits de l'homme pour prévenir la violence sexuelle contre les enfants
Troisième partie : La réadaptation et la réintégration sociale des enfants victimes et auteurs d'abus
16. Les services de réadaptation pour les enfants victimes de violence sexuelle et pour leur famille - Que proposer ?
17. Enfants et adolescents auteurs d'abus sexuels - Pour une approche de la réhabilitation fondée sur des preuves scientifiques
18. Les enfants et les jeunes au comportement sexuel dangereux - Qu'avons-nous appris et que devons-nous savoir pour intervenir efficacement ?
Quatrième partie : La violence sexuelle sur internet
19. Le rôle d'internet dans la violence sexuelle contre des enfants
20. Sensibiliser pour combattre la violence sexuelle en ligne
Cinquième partie : Les partenariats public-privé pour éliminer la violence sexuelle à l'encontre des enfants
21. Mobiliser le secteur du voyage et du tourisme en faveur de la protection des enfants contre l'exploitation sexuelle
22. Stop au trafic des mineurs à des fins sexuelles - Une campagne sans précédent de l'ECPAT et de The Body Shop
Annexe
Sélection de conventions et de textes adoptes par le Conseil de l'Europe
Construire une Europe pour et avec les enfants - publications

More Details on The Council of Europe Website

Discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity in Europe
Edition: (2nd edition) (2011)
Format: Paperback
Author: Council of Europe
ISBN: 978-92-871-7257-0
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: € 9 / US$ 18
Publication Date: 2011

Publisher's Title Information

Many people in Europe are stigmatised because of their sexual orientation or gender identity and cannot fully enjoy their universal human rights. Some of them are victims of violence, others have fled to Europe from countries where they risk being persecuted. Organisations representing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons have been denied registration or banned from organising peaceful meetings in some states in Europe. Too few politicians have taken a firm stand against homophobic and transphobic expressions, discrimination and violence.
This report presents the results of the largest socio-legal study ever carried out on discrimination on grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity in the 47 member states of the Council of Europe. Six thematic chapters give a broad overview of the human rights situation of LGBT persons and recommendations are provided for developing and implementing effective measures to address discrimination.
The report is intended as a tool for dialogue with authorities and other stakeholders. It constitutes a baseline study for further action in both legislative and policy fields to ensure that all LGBT people can effectively exercise their human rights.

Contents

Foreword
Summary
Recommendations
Introduction
1. Attitudes and perceptions
1.1. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons
1.2. Criminalisation and medical classifications
1.3. Attitudes towards LGBT persons
1.4. Perceptions of the nation, religion and traditional values
1.5. Perceptions of LGBT persons' visibility and use of public space
1.6. Media
2. Legal standards and their implementation
2.1. Introduction
2.2. International and European standards
2.3. National standards
2.4. National structures for promoting equality
2.5. National policy initiatives
3. Protection: violence and asylum
3.1. Introduction
3.2. Violence against LGBT persons
3.3. Asylum on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity
4. Participation: freedoms of assembly, expression and association
4.1. Introduction
4.2. International and European standards
4.3. Situation in the member states
5. Privacy: gender recognition and family life
5.1. Introduction
5.2. Recognition of transgender persons' new gender and name
5.3. The right to marry and legally contract a partnership
5.4. Parenting and children
6. Access to health care, education and employment
6.1. Introduction
6.2. Health
6.3. Education
6.4. Employment
Conclusions
Appendix: Terms and concepts

Available in French

Résumé
En Europe, de nombreuses personnes sont montrées du doigt en raison de leur orientation sexuelle, ou de leur identité de genre, et privées de la possibilité de jouir pleinement de leurs droits de l'homme universels. Certaines d'entre elles sont victimes de violence, d'autres se sont refugiées en Europe pour fuir des pays où elles risquaient d'être persécutées. Certains Etats européens refusent d'enregistrer des organisations représentant les personnes lesbiennes, gays, bisexuelles et transgenres (LGBT) ou leur interdisent de se réunir pacifiquement. Trop rares sont les responsables politiques qui prennent fermement position contre la discrimination, la violence et les autres manifestations d'homophobie et de transphobie.
 
Le présent rapport expose les résultats de la plus vaste étude socio-juridique jamais consacrée à la discrimination fondée sur l'orientation sexuelle et l'identité de genre dans les 47 Etats membres du Conseil de l'Europe. Six chapitres thématiques offrent une large vue d'ensemble de la situation des personnes LGBT au regard des droits de l'homme, et des recommandations sont proposées en vue d'élaborer et de mettre en œuvre des mesures efficaces pour lutter centre la discrimination.
 
Cette étude a été conçue comme un outil de dialogue avec les autorités et les autres parties prenantes. Elle constitue un état des lieux dans la perspective d'actions futures dans les domaines législatif et politique afin que toutes les personnes LGBT puissent véritablement exercer leurs droits fondamentaux.
Table des matières
Avant-propos
Résumé
Recommandations
Introduction
1. Attitudes et perceptions
1.1. Personnes lesbiennes, gays, bisexuelles et transgenres
1.2. Pénalisation et classifications médicales
1.3. Attitudes à l'égard des personnes LGBT
1.4. Représentations de la nation, de la religion et des valeurs traditionnelles
1.5. Perceptions de la visibilité des personnes LGBT et de leur présence dans l'espace public
1.6. Médias
2. Normes juridiques et leur mise en œuvre
2.1. Introduction
2.2. Normes internationales et européennes
2.3. Normes nationales
2.4. Structures nationales de promotion de l'égalité
2.5. Initiatives politiques nationales
3. Protection: violence et droit d'asile
3.1. Introduction
3.2. Violence à l'égard des personnes LGBT
3.3. Asile accordé en raison de l'orientation sexuelle ou de l'identité de genre
4. Participation : libertés de réunion, d'expression et d'association
4.1. Introduction
4.2. Normes internationales et européennes
4.3. Situation dans les Etats membres
5. Vie privée : reconnaissance du genre et vie de famille
5.1. Introduction
5.2. Reconnaissance du nouveau genre et du nouveau nom des personnes transgenres
5.3. Le droit de se marier et de conclure légalement un partenariat
5.4. La parentalité et les enfants
6. Accès aux soins, à l'éducation et à l'emploi
6.1. Introduction
6.2. Santé
6.3. Education
6.4. Emploi
Conclusions
Annexe : Termes et concepts

More Details on The Council of Europe Website


Dirty Money
The evolution of International measures to counter money laundering and the financing of Terrorism
Edition: 4th
Format: Paperback
Author: William c Gilmore
ISBN: 9789287170699
Publishers: Council of Europe
Price: E39 £32.50
Publication Date: 2011
 

Publisher's Title Information

Anti-money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) continues to be a dynamic subject area. Dirty money has again been revised and expanded to keep pace with international developments over recent years, and this is the fourth edition.
 
Since the third edition, all countries in the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and MONEYVAL, the Council of Europe's primary AML/CFT monitoring arm, have been subject to detailed evaluation under the 2003 FATF recommendations. This edition explains how the interdependent network of global assessment bodies works to identify countries which pose threats to the global financial system. The European Union's third directive has been brought into force since the last edition and its provisions are fully analysed. This edition also explains how the most recent Council of Europe treaty in this area, the Warsaw convention, which came into force in 2008, can assist states to achieve more effective money laundering investigations and prosecutions, as well as deterrent confiscation orders.
 
This book, as with the previous editions, is designed for a wide audience, not only actors in national AML/CFT systems in both the public and private sectors, but also all those who simply wish to be better informed about how the international community continues to fight these truly global threats.

Contents

Acknowledgements
Foreword
Chapter I - Transnational and organised crime: the contours of the problem
The context
The strategy
Chapter II - Money laundering: an overview of the process
Introduction
The money laundering process
The stages of the process
Money laundering techniques
The context
Deposit-taking institutions
Non-bank financial institutions
Non-financial institutions
"Gatekeepers"
The emergence of new challenges
Conclusions
Chapter III - Global responses to money laundering
The United Nations
Introduction: the focus on drugs
Major provisions of the 1988 UN convention
Money laundering and confiscation
Other important provisions
Conclusions
The UN conventions on transnational organised crime and corruption
The 1999 UN International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism
Supportive UN activities
Global law enforcement co-operation
The Egmont Group
Chapter IV- The Financial Action Task Force
The background
The structure and purpose of the FATF
The 1990 FATF recommendations
The context
The nature of the 1990 recommendations
The general framework of the 1990 recommendations
Improvement of national legal systems
Enhancement of the role of the financial system
Strengthening of international co-operation
The 1996 revised FATF recommendations
The context
The 1996 revisions
The 2003 revised FATF recommendations
The context
The 2003 revisions
Chapter V - The Financial Action Task Force and the financing of terrorism
Background and context
The aftermath of 11 September 2001
The UN Security Council
The Financial Action Task Force
Conclusions
Chapter VI - The continuing work of the Financial Action Task Force
Mandate and priorities
Monitoring implementation by FATF members
Reviewing developments in money laundering methods and countermeasures
The FATF external relations activities
The strategy in overview
The NCCT initiative and its progeny
Future challenges
Chapter VII - Pan-European responses to money laundering
The context
Money laundering initiatives
The context
The 1990 Council of Europe convention
The 2005 Warsaw convention
The human rights dimension
MONEYVAL
Chapter VIII - Action within the European Union
The context
The 1991 Directive
Background and development
The requirements of the 1991 Directive and their implementation
The 2001 Directive
The 2005 Directive
Extraterritorial issues
The strategy of prevention: associated initiatives
Other relevant EU actions
Chapter IX - Conclusions
Appendices
Appendix I
The 1990 recommendations of the FATF on money laundering
Appendix II
The 1996 revised FATF recommendations
Appendix III
The 2003 revised FATF recommendations and interpretative notes
Appendix IV
The 2001 FATF Special Recommendations on Terrorist Financing and interpretative notes
Appendix V
The 2005 Council of Europe Convention on Laundering, Search, Seizure and Confiscation of the Proceeds from Crime and on the Financing of Terrorism
Appendix VI
Resolution CM/Res(2010)12 on the Statute of the Committee of Experts on the Evaluation of Anti-Money Laundering Measures and the Financing of Terrorism (MONEYVAL)
Appendix VII
Directive 2005/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 October 2005 on the prevention of the

More Details on The Council of Europe Website
LINKS

"Internet Law Book Reviews, Copyright Rob Jerrard 2012